Argentinian Food Culture

Collection by Lamia Abid

14 
Pins

A small look into food in Argentinian culture

Lamia Abid
Eating Patterns
Etiquette and Manners
Food Preparation Responsibilities
Celebration and Traditional Foods
Other Pins

Eating Patterns

Dinner in Argentina is arguably the largest meal of the day. It occurs at 9 pm or 9:30 pm during weekdays and can start at 11 pm at the latest on weekends. Dinner usually consists of asado, pasta, pizza, empanadas, and milanesa.

Dinner in Argentina is arguably the largest meal of the day. It occurs at 9 pm or 9:30 pm during weekdays and can start at 11 pm at the latest on weekends. Dinner usually consists of asado, pasta, pizza, empanadas, and milanesa.

During the late afternoon, Argentinians enjoy a light meal called merienda, that consists of tea or coffee, pastries and toasted ham sandwiches.

During the late afternoon, Argentinians enjoy a light meal called merienda, that consists of tea or coffee, pastries and toasted ham sandwiches.

Lunch in Argentina takes place around 1 pm -1.30 pm and typically consists of pizza or parrilla (pictured).

Lunch in Argentina takes place around 1 pm -1.30 pm and typically consists of pizza or parrilla (pictured).

Many Argentinean people do not eat breakfast, due to the fact that their dinner time is very late. Their typical breakfast consists of coffee and toast or crepes, topped with dulce de leche  (shown above).

Many Argentinean people do not eat breakfast, due to the fact that their dinner time is very late. Their typical breakfast consists of coffee and toast or crepes, topped with dulce de leche (shown above).

Etiquette and Manners

Special rules for the dinner table are to never pour wine backwards into the glass, as this means that you very much dislike the person you are pouring for, and do not use your left hand to pour the wine for the same reason. To add, you must ever cut lettuce in a salad, instead, fold it with your knife and fork into a bundle that can be picked up with your fork.

Special rules for the dinner table are to never pour wine backwards into the glass, as this means that you very much dislike the person you are pouring for, and do not use your left hand to pour the wine for the same reason. To add, you must ever cut lettuce in a salad, instead, fold it with your knife and fork into a bundle that can be picked up with your fork.

At an Argentinian dinner, you are not allowed to start eating until the host says, "iBuen provecho!" (bon appetite in Spanish). For passing food, you must pass all food to the your left. Lastly, when not holding utensils, your hands must be seen above the table with your wrists on top of the table (never elbows).

At an Argentinian dinner, you are not allowed to start eating until the host says, "iBuen provecho!" (bon appetite in Spanish). For passing food, you must pass all food to the your left. Lastly, when not holding utensils, your hands must be seen above the table with your wrists on top of the table (never elbows).

Seating arrangements in Argentina are appropriate to show respect towards guests. A typical seating arrangement would include the most honored position is at the head of the table, the most important guest seated next to the host or hostess and women are to the right of the host, while men are to the right of the hostess.

Seating arrangements in Argentina are appropriate to show respect towards guests. A typical seating arrangement would include the most honored position is at the head of the table, the most important guest seated next to the host or hostess and women are to the right of the host, while men are to the right of the hostess.

Typical Argentinian table settings are as follows: fork and spoon above your plate are for dessert, start from the outside and work your way in, by course. There are separate glasses for water, white and red wine or beer and after-dinner drink glasses come out after dinner.

Typical Argentinian table settings are as follows: fork and spoon above your plate are for dessert, start from the outside and work your way in, by course. There are separate glasses for water, white and red wine or beer and after-dinner drink glasses come out after dinner.

Food Preparation Responsibilities

Argentinians obtain food from supermarkets, but vendors also sell food on the streets. Ice cream vendors sell helado (Argentine ice cream), peanuts, popcorn, and candied apples. Some vendors sell choripan (a sausage sandwich). Empanadas , little pies stuffed with beef, chicken, seafood, or vegetables, are a popular snack. Children can take vegetable-filled empanadas to school for lunch. A favorite drink is a submarino , or milk with chocolate syrup.

Argentinians obtain food from supermarkets, but vendors also sell food on the streets. Ice cream vendors sell helado (Argentine ice cream), peanuts, popcorn, and candied apples. Some vendors sell choripan (a sausage sandwich). Empanadas , little pies stuffed with beef, chicken, seafood, or vegetables, are a popular snack. Children can take vegetable-filled empanadas to school for lunch. A favorite drink is a submarino , or milk with chocolate syrup.

Generally, women are expected to prepare food in Argentina.

Generally, women are expected to prepare food in Argentina.

Kitchens in Argentina resemble North American kitchens.

Kitchens in Argentina resemble North American kitchens.

Celebration and Traditional Foods

Common foods that are eaten in Argentina include asados (a variety of barbecued meat) grilled on a parillo (a large grill) that is packed with steaks; ribs; chorizo; mollejas (sweetbread), chinchulines (chitterlings) and morcilla (blood sausage).

Common foods that are eaten in Argentina include asados (a variety of barbecued meat) grilled on a parillo (a large grill) that is packed with steaks; ribs; chorizo; mollejas (sweetbread), chinchulines (chitterlings) and morcilla (blood sausage).

During Lent (a 40-day prior to Easter), Argentinians eat spicy food, including  humitas en chala, a corn patties wrapped and cooked in it's husk, It is a tradition to eat a cake in the shape of a large ring. On Easter, children eat chocolate eggs with tiny candies hidden inside. Argentinians eat more seafood dishes during this time, due to the Roman Catholic Church instructing not to eat meat. Bocaditos (finger sandwiches), made with shrimp are a popular lunch or snack food during Lent.

During Lent (a 40-day prior to Easter), Argentinians eat spicy food, including humitas en chala, a corn patties wrapped and cooked in it's husk, It is a tradition to eat a cake in the shape of a large ring. On Easter, children eat chocolate eggs with tiny candies hidden inside. Argentinians eat more seafood dishes during this time, due to the Roman Catholic Church instructing not to eat meat. Bocaditos (finger sandwiches), made with shrimp are a popular lunch or snack food during Lent.

Decoration for Christmas in Argentina consists of Christmas trees, with lights and ornaments, balloons, nativity scenes (pictured), and wreaths and garland.

Decoration for Christmas in Argentina consists of Christmas trees, with lights and ornaments, balloons, nativity scenes (pictured), and wreaths and garland.

Other Pins

Common foods that are eaten in Argentina include asados (a variety of barbecued meat) grilled on a parillo (a large grill) that is packed with steaks; ribs; chorizo; mollejas (sweetbread), chinchulines (chitterlings) and morcilla (blood sausage).

Common foods that are eaten in Argentina include asados (a variety of barbecued meat) grilled on a parillo (a large grill) that is packed with steaks; ribs; chorizo; mollejas (sweetbread), chinchulines (chitterlings) and morcilla (blood sausage).

During Lent (a 40-day prior to Easter), Argentinians eat spicy food, including  humitas en chala, a corn patties wrapped and cooked in it's husk, It is a tradition to eat a cake in the shape of a large ring. On Easter, children eat chocolate eggs with tiny candies hidden inside. Argentinians eat more seafood dishes during this time, due to the Roman Catholic Church instructing not to eat meat. Bocaditos (finger sandwiches), made with shrimp are a popular lunch or snack food during Lent.

During Lent (a 40-day prior to Easter), Argentinians eat spicy food, including humitas en chala, a corn patties wrapped and cooked in it's husk, It is a tradition to eat a cake in the shape of a large ring. On Easter, children eat chocolate eggs with tiny candies hidden inside. Argentinians eat more seafood dishes during this time, due to the Roman Catholic Church instructing not to eat meat. Bocaditos (finger sandwiches), made with shrimp are a popular lunch or snack food during Lent.

Decoration for Christmas in Argentina consists of Christmas trees, with lights and ornaments, balloons, nativity scenes (pictured), and wreaths and garland.

Decoration for Christmas in Argentina consists of Christmas trees, with lights and ornaments, balloons, nativity scenes (pictured), and wreaths and garland.

Argentinians obtain food from supermarkets, but vendors also sell food on the streets. Ice cream vendors sell helado (Argentine ice cream), peanuts, popcorn, and candied apples. Some vendors sell choripan (a sausage sandwich). Empanadas , little pies stuffed with beef, chicken, seafood, or vegetables, are a popular snack. Children can take vegetable-filled empanadas to school for lunch. A favorite drink is a submarino , or milk with chocolate syrup.

Argentinians obtain food from supermarkets, but vendors also sell food on the streets. Ice cream vendors sell helado (Argentine ice cream), peanuts, popcorn, and candied apples. Some vendors sell choripan (a sausage sandwich). Empanadas , little pies stuffed with beef, chicken, seafood, or vegetables, are a popular snack. Children can take vegetable-filled empanadas to school for lunch. A favorite drink is a submarino , or milk with chocolate syrup.

Generally, women are expected to prepare food in Argentina.

Generally, women are expected to prepare food in Argentina.

Kitchens in Argentina resemble North American kitchens.

Kitchens in Argentina resemble North American kitchens.

Special rules for the dinner table are to never pour wine backwards into the glass, as this means that you very much dislike the person you are pouring for, and do not use your left hand to pour the wine for the same reason. To add, you must ever cut lettuce in a salad, instead, fold it with your knife and fork into a bundle that can be picked up with your fork.

Special rules for the dinner table are to never pour wine backwards into the glass, as this means that you very much dislike the person you are pouring for, and do not use your left hand to pour the wine for the same reason. To add, you must ever cut lettuce in a salad, instead, fold it with your knife and fork into a bundle that can be picked up with your fork.

At an Argentinian dinner, you are not allowed to start eating until the host says, "iBuen provecho!" (bon appetite in Spanish). For passing food, you must pass all food to the your left. Lastly, when not holding utensils, your hands must be seen above the table with your wrists on top of the table (never elbows).

At an Argentinian dinner, you are not allowed to start eating until the host says, "iBuen provecho!" (bon appetite in Spanish). For passing food, you must pass all food to the your left. Lastly, when not holding utensils, your hands must be seen above the table with your wrists on top of the table (never elbows).

Seating arrangements in Argentina are appropriate to show respect towards guests. A typical seating arrangement would include the most honored position is at the head of the table, the most important guest seated next to the host or hostess and women are to the right of the host, while men are to the right of the hostess.

Seating arrangements in Argentina are appropriate to show respect towards guests. A typical seating arrangement would include the most honored position is at the head of the table, the most important guest seated next to the host or hostess and women are to the right of the host, while men are to the right of the hostess.

Typical Argentinian table settings are as follows: fork and spoon above your plate are for dessert, start from the outside and work your way in, by course. There are separate glasses for water, white and red wine or beer and after-dinner drink glasses come out after dinner.

Typical Argentinian table settings are as follows: fork and spoon above your plate are for dessert, start from the outside and work your way in, by course. There are separate glasses for water, white and red wine or beer and after-dinner drink glasses come out after dinner.

Dinner in Argentina is arguably the largest meal of the day. It occurs at 9 pm or 9:30 pm during weekdays and can start at 11 pm at the latest on weekends. Dinner usually consists of asado, pasta, pizza, empanadas, and milanesa.

Dinner in Argentina is arguably the largest meal of the day. It occurs at 9 pm or 9:30 pm during weekdays and can start at 11 pm at the latest on weekends. Dinner usually consists of asado, pasta, pizza, empanadas, and milanesa.

During the late afternoon, Argentinians enjoy a light meal called merienda, that consists of tea or coffee, pastries and toasted ham sandwiches.

During the late afternoon, Argentinians enjoy a light meal called merienda, that consists of tea or coffee, pastries and toasted ham sandwiches.

Lunch in Argentina takes place around 1 pm -1.30 pm and typically consists of pizza or parrilla (pictured).

Lunch in Argentina takes place around 1 pm -1.30 pm and typically consists of pizza or parrilla (pictured).

Many Argentinean people do not eat breakfast, due to the fact that their dinner time is very late. Their typical breakfast consists of coffee and toast or crepes, topped with dulce de leche  (shown above).

Many Argentinean people do not eat breakfast, due to the fact that their dinner time is very late. Their typical breakfast consists of coffee and toast or crepes, topped with dulce de leche (shown above).