Susan Aglukark (Inuktitut syllabics: ᓲᓴᓐ ᐊᒡᓘᒃᑲᖅ suusan agluukkaq), born in 1967 in Churchill, Manitoba. She is an Inuk musician whose blend of Inuit folk music traditions with country and pop songwriting has made her a major recording star in Canada. Her most successful single is "O Siem", which reached No. 1 on the Canadian country and adult contemporary charts in 1995. She has released 7 studio albums and has won 3 Juno Awards.

Susan Aglukark (b. 1967 in Churchill MB), Canadian Inuk musician whose blend of Inuit folk music traditions and country and pop songwriting has made her a Juno Award-winner and major recording star in Canada. Her work includes "This Child'

Elisapie's mother is Inuk and her father is from Newfoundland. She was adopted at birth by an Inuit family and raised in that culture. Her cradle: Salluit, Nunavik. For Elisapie, the North is not at the end of the earth; rather, it is at the centre.

Elisapie's mother is Inuk and her father is from Newfoundland. She was adopted at birth by an Inuit family and raised in that culture. Her cradle: Salluit, Nunavik. For Elisapie, the North is not at the end of the earth;

Joe Talirunili (1893 - 1976). In the 1950s, Talirunili focused more on sculptures, migration scenes of umiaks, Inuit men and women, hunting scenes and caribou. He got into printmaking graphics in the 1960s. In all of Joe’s work, sculptures, prints and drawings, he tells stories from his traditions, childhood and people’s lives, camp life, hunting scenes, owls, other animals and his famous “migration” works. In 1978, one of Joe’s sculptures was reproduced on a 1978 Canadian postage stamp.

Joe Talirunili (1893 - 1976). In the 1950s, Talirunili focused more on sculptures, migration scenes of umiaks, Inuit men and women, hunting scenes and caribou. He got into printmaking graphics in the 1960s. In all of Joe’s work, sculptures, prints and drawings, he tells stories from his traditions, childhood and people’s lives, camp life, hunting scenes, owls, other animals and his famous “migration” works. In 1978, one of Joe’s sculptures was reproduced on a 1978 Canadian postage stamp.

Eli Elijassiapik (b. 1936). Elijassiapik’s carvings from the late 1960s are moderate in size, round, and usually depict fish or birds. He also accentuated his larger figurative sculptures’ elliptical-shaped eyes with ivory or bone inlay. Elijassiapik was President of the Inukjuak Community Council for many years, and served on the board of directors of La Fédération Coopératives du Nouveau-Québec.

Eli Elijassiapik (b. 1936). Elijassiapik’s carvings from the late 1960s are moderate in size, round, and usually depict fish or birds. He also accentuated his larger figurative sculptures’ elliptical-shaped eyes with ivory or bone inlay. Elijassiapik was President of the Inukjuak Community Council for many years, and served on the board of directors of La Fédération Coopératives du Nouveau-Québec.

Beatrice Deer is one of Nunavik’s favorite singer-songwriters. Originally from Quaqtaq, she now lives and works out of Montreal

Beatrice Deer is one of Nunavik’s favorite singer-songwriters. Originally from Quaqtaq, she now lives and works out of Montreal

Emily Novalinga (1954-2009). A true pioneer in Nunavimmiut poetry. Emily began her professional career as a teacher Puvirnituq, but over the years, she earned recognition as one of the most talented poets, writers and story-tellers in the region. Today, Emily’s poems can be found in a variety of publications and the public sphere. In fact, one of her poems is an integral part of a work by the sculptor Michel Goulet, which is on permanent display in the Place de la Gare du Palais in Quebec…

Tribute to Emily Novalinga - Aumaaggiivik Nunavik Arts Secretariat - Aumaaggiivik

Mattiusi Iyaituk (b. 1950). While Iyaituk’s earlier works reflect conventional Inuit iconography, his abstract work often records personal experiences. He says his abstract works were born accidentally in 1979: “One day, I was doing a sculpture of a man, but I didn’t like it. So I just made shapes on one side. Since then, I have been doing sculptures using abstract forms”. Iyaituk served as President of the Inuit Art Foundation in Ottawa, Canada from 1996–2012.

Mattiusi Iyaituk (b. 1950). While Iyaituk’s earlier works reflect conventional Inuit iconography, his abstract work often records personal experiences. He says his abstract works were born accidentally in 1979: “One day, I was doing a sculpture of a man, but I didn’t like it. So I just made shapes on one side. Since then, I have been doing sculptures using abstract forms”. Iyaituk served as President of the Inuit Art Foundation in Ottawa, Canada from 1996–2012.

Johnny Inukpuk (1911–2007). Sculpture and one print. In 1974, he made a single print, entitled A True Story of Johnny Being Attacked by Three Polar Bears While in His Igloo, to document a real life hunting experience of his. With the TD Bank Financial Group’s 1951 purchase of Hunter, possibly the first large figure produced by a Canadian Inuk at that time. Inukpuk’s work was also included in Eskimo Carvings, an exhibition organized by Gimpel Fils gallery in London, England in 1953.

Johnny Inukpuk (1911–2007). Sculpture and one print. In 1974, he made a single print, entitled A True Story of Johnny Being Attacked by Three Polar Bears While in His Igloo, to document a real life hunting experience of his. With the TD Bank Financial Group’s 1951 purchase of Hunter, possibly the first large figure produced by a Canadian Inuk at that time. Inukpuk’s work was also included in Eskimo Carvings, an exhibition organized by Gimpel Fils gallery in London, England in 1953.

Davidialuk Alasua Ammitu (1910–1976). Best known for his sculptures and prints, which often portrayed mythological elements, Davidialuk’s work also frequently dealt with issues of survival. Highly regarded at an international level, Davidialuk’s work is included in important collections of Inuit art such as that of the National Gallery of Canada, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the Glenbow Museum, the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and the Royal Ontario Museum, to name a few.

Davidialuk Alasua Ammitu (1910–1976). Best known for his sculptures and prints, which often portrayed mythological elements, Davidialuk’s work also frequently dealt with issues of survival. Highly regarded at an international level, Davidialuk’s work is included in important collections of Inuit art such as that of the National Gallery of Canada, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the Glenbow Museum, the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and the Royal Ontario Museum, to name a few.

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