Nunavik communities

The vast area of Northern Québec now known as Nunavik [the place where we live] extends over 560,000 square kilometres. For approximately 4000 years, various human groups occupied this territory. The Inuit arrived in the Canadian Arctic 700 to 800 years ago and now inhabit the entire circumpolar region. Today, there are 14 villages in Nunavik.
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Salluit, meaning "the thin ones". Salluit stands at the far end of the narrow Sugluk Inlet, 10 km inland from the Hudson Strait, hidden between high, rugged mountains rising close to 500 m. Salluit being the middle point between Nunavik's 14 communities, it is a strategic location for meetings attended by people of the Hudson and Ungava coasts. Population: 1241

Salluit, meaning "the thin ones". Salluit stands at the far end of the narrow Sugluk Inlet, 10 km inland from the Hudson Strait, hidden between high, rugged mountains rising close to 500 m. Salluit being the middle point between Nunavik's 14 communities, it is a strategic location for meetings attended by people of the Hudson and Ungava coasts. Population: 1241

Kuujjuaq (The great river)  Daily life in this community is closely tied to the mighty river. The ebb and flow of its tides are continually altering the landscape and they impose their rhythm on the practice of traditional summer activities. Experience travel to Quebec's north at opXpeditions Kuururjuaq: http://www.opxpeditions.com/kuururjuaq/

Kuujjuaq (The great river) Daily life in this community is closely tied to the mighty river. The ebb and flow of its tides are continually altering the landscape and they impose their rhythm on the practice of traditional summer activities.

Le village de Kangiqsualujjuaq, au Québec, Nunavik

Le village de Kangiqsualujjuaq, au Québec, Nunavik

Puvirnituq, means “putrefied.” It was here that an entire community of Inuit died in a famine one winter; not a single survivor remained to tell of the event. The following spring, the igloos melted, and people found the corpses giving off the odour of putrefaction. The community was named to commemorate the event, although it’s not a very felicitous name for a town. Population: 507

Northern village of Puvirnituq Povungnituk Puvirnituq Quebec Nunavik .

Kangiqsualujjuaq (The very large bay)  Tidal movements reach as far upstream as the village so that, at low tide, water recedes almost entirely from the cove. Kangiqsualujjuamiut’s summer life is therefore closely linked to the rhythm of the tides. Experience travel to Quebec's north at opXpeditions Kuururjuaq: http://www.opxpeditions.com/kuururjuaq/

Kangiqsualujjuaq (The very large bay) Tidal movements reach as far upstream as the village so that, at low tide, water recedes almost entirely from the cove. Kangiqsualujjuamiut’s summer life is therefore closely linked to the rhythm of the tides.

Akulivik, the village takes its name from surrounding geography. A peninsula jutting into Hudson Bay between two small bodies of water, the area evokes the shape of a kakivak, a traditional, trident-shaped spear used for fishing. The inhabitants of the region lived on Cape Smith Island until the Hudsons Bay post there was shut down. They relocated to Puvirnituq. In 1975, they moved back to the area and built the village of Akulivik. Population: 507

Akulivik, the village takes its name from surrounding geography. A peninsula jutting into Hudson Bay between two small bodies of water, the area evokes the shape of a kakivak, a traditional, trident-shaped spear used for fishing. The inhabitants of the region lived on Cape Smith Island until the Hudsons Bay post there was shut down. They relocated to Puvirnituq. In 1975, they moved back to the area and built the village of Akulivik. Population: 507

Inukjuak, means “many Inuit lived here.” It is known for its turquoise water and turbulent rapids. The many archaeological sites scattered along the meandering river evidence thousands of years of inhabitation. It was in 1953 that Inuit from Inukjuak were involuntarily relocated north by the Government of Canada. Today, Inukjuaq is one of the largest communities in Nunavik. Population: 1597

Quebec Inuit Off-Grid Community Support Hydro Project to Replace Diesel Electricity

Quaqtaq, meaning "tapeworm". The village of Quaqtaq is located on the eastern shore of Diana Bay, called Tuvaaluk (the large ice field) in Inuktitut, on a peninsula which protrudes into the Hudson Strait where it meets Ungava Bay. Mountains stand on the peninsula to the north and to the south-east are short, rocky hills. The region around Diana Bay is rich with land and sea mammals, as well as fish and seafood, including mussels, scallops and clams. Population: 315

Quaqtaq, meaning "tapeworm". The village of Quaqtaq is located on the eastern shore of Diana Bay, called Tuvaaluk (the large ice field) in Inuktitut, on a peninsula which protrudes into the Hudson Strait where it meets Ungava Bay. Mountains stand on the peninsula to the north and to the south-east are short, rocky hills. The region around Diana Bay is rich with land and sea mammals, as well as fish and seafood, including mussels, scallops and clams. Population: 315

The vast area of Northern Québec now known as Nunavik [the place where we live] extends over 560,000 square kilometres. For approximately 4000 years, various human groups occupied this territory. The Inuit arrived in the Canadian Arctic 700 to 800 years ago and now inhabit the entire circumpolar region. Today, there are 14 villages in Nunavik.

The vast area of Northern Québec now known as Nunavik [the place where we live] extends over 560,000 square kilometres. For approximately 4000 years, various human groups occupied this territory. The Inuit arrived in the Canadian Arctic 700 to 800 years ago and now inhabit the entire circumpolar region. Today, there are 14 villages in Nunavik.


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