Jean Paul Lemieux: Life & Work by Michèle Grandbois

One of Quebec’s most renowned artists, Lemieux (1904–1990) developed a signature style influenced by folk art and the Italian primitive school. His lyrical work, characterized by simplified forms, captures the province’s way of life. Read or download the online art book here: http://www.aci-iac.ca/jean-paul-lemieux
70 Pins132 Followers
Edwin Holgate’s influence can be seen in this illustration of Lemieux’s that was included in the first chapter of Robert Choquette’s La pension Leblanc (1927), a novel about a boarding house for tourists north of Montreal. #ArtCanInstitute

Edwin Holgate’s influence can be seen in this illustration of Lemieux’s that was included in the first chapter of Robert Choquette’s La pension Leblanc a novel about a boarding house for tourists north of Montreal.

Lemieux's classic period, which would last from 1956 to 1970, is characterized by a horizontal format, bare subject matter, and simplified pictorial space. “The Far West” (Le Far West), 1955, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. #ArtCanInstitute

Lemieux's classic period, which would last from 1956 to is characterized by a horizontal format, bare subject matter, and simplified pictorial space. “The Far West” (Le Far West), Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Many of Edwin Holgate’s wood engravings of the period depict lumberjacks, blacksmiths, and weavers in rural settings. Holgate, “The Spinning Wheel,” 1928. #ArtCanInstitute

Many of Edwin Holgate’s wood engravings of the period depict lumberjacks, blacksmiths, and weavers in rural settings. Holgate, “The Spinning Wheel,”

In what is known as Lemieux's primitivist period (1940–1946), his art borrowed from the Italian primitives and from naïve art. Several large compositions combining religious and secular content date from this period. “Our Lady Protecting Quebec City” (Notre Dame protégeant Québec), 1942, Séminaire de Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

In what is known as Lemieux's primitivist period (1940–1946), his art borrowed from the Italian primitives and from naïve art. Several large compositions combining religious and secular content date from this period. “Our Lady Protecting Quebec City” (Notre Dame protégeant Québec), 1942, Séminaire de Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

In 1917 the Lemieux family moved to Montreal. There Jean Paul went to the Collège Mont-Saint-Louis, then Loyola College. During this period he took lessons in watercolours and, in 1926, began studies with the respected Canadian Impressionist painter Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté. de Foy Suzor-Coté, “Passing Shadows, Nicolet River” (Les ombres qui passent, rivière Nicolet), 1925, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

In 1917 the Lemieux family moved to Montreal. There Jean Paul went to the Collège Mont-Saint-Louis, then Loyola College. During this period he took lessons in watercolours and, in 1926, began studies with the respected Canadian Impressionist painter Marc-Aurèle de Foy Suzor-Coté. de Foy Suzor-Coté, “Passing Shadows, Nicolet River” (Les ombres qui passent, rivière Nicolet), 1925, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

Lemieux, Jori Smith, and Jean Palardy together briefly ran the ad agency JANSS. Smith, “Portrait of Jean Paul Lemieux,” c. 1932, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

Lemieux, Jori Smith, and Jean Palardy together briefly ran the ad agency JANSS…

Lemieux was only the second Canadian artist commissioned to paint an official portrait of a reigning monarch. The painting caused quite a stir when it was unveiled, but Lemieux defended it, describing it as “a Canadian painting, nothing to do with the formal English representations of the Queen.” “Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh,” 1979, Government House. #ArtCanInstitute

“Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh” 1979

Jean Paul Lemieux (left) with his brother, Henri, at the Kent House hotel, c. 1910. #ArtCanInstitute

Jean Paul Lemieux (left) with his brother, Henri, at the Kent House hotel, c.

Madeleine and Jean Paul Lemieux, outside the church on their wedding day in June of 1937. #ArtCanInstitute

Madeleine and Jean Paul Lemieux, outside the church on their wedding day in June of

With their fluid brushwork and vibrant colour palettes, landscapes by Lemieux from this period show the influence of Group of Seven members A.Y. Jackson and Edwin Holgate. “Seascape, Bay St. Paul” (Marine, Baie Saint-Paul), 1935, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. #ArtCanInstitute

With their fluid brushwork and vibrant colour palettes, landscapes by Lemieux from this period show the influence of Group of Seven members A. Jackson and Edwin Holgate. Paul” (Marine, Baie Saint-Paul), Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

In social-realist fashion, Lemieux satirized the English bourgeois that were considered dominant in Quebec at this time. “The Birds I Have Known” (Les drôles d’oiseaux que j’ai connus), 1947, National Gallery of Canada. #ArtCanInstitute

In social-realist fashion, Lemieux satirized the English bourgeois that were considered dominant in Quebec at this time. “The Birds I Have Known” (Les drôles d’oiseaux que j’ai connus), National Gallery of Canada.

The drawing would have been highly controversial had it been presented publicly, as it satirizes both a Catholic priest and L’Action Catholique, the leading Catholic publication in Quebec. “L’Action Catholique,” 1945, National Gallery of Canada. #ArtCanInstitute

The drawing would have been highly controversial had it been presented publicly, as it satirizes both a Catholic priest and L’Action Catholique, the leading Catholic publication in Quebec. “L’Action Catholique,” National Gallery of Canada.

Lemieux painted “Those Beautiful Days” (Les beaux jours, 1937, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec) at Port-au-Persil, between La Malbaie and Saint-Siméon, where he and his young wife, Madeleine Des Rosiers, spent the summer of 1937. #ArtCanInstitute

Those Beautiful Days (Les beaux jours) - Jean Paul Lemieux ,

Kent House, presently known as Manoir Montmorency, is visible at the top left. “Summer of 1914” (L’été de 1914), 1965, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

Kent House, presently known as Manoir Montmorency, is visible at the top left. “Summer of 1914” (L’été de 1914), 1965, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. #ArtCanInstitute

Pinterest
Search