Joyce Wieland: Life & Work by Johanne Sloan

Filmmaker, painter, and multimedia artist Wieland (1930–1998) created startlingly original art, influenced by feminism, nationalism, and environmentalism. In 1971 the National Gallery of Canada celebrated Wieland with its first solo show dedicated to a living Canadian woman artist. Read or download the online art book here: http://www.aci-iac.ca/joyce-wieland
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While employed at the firm Graphic Associates, which made animated and commercial films, Wieland met fellow artist Michael Snow (b. 1928). Wieland and Snow in 1964, photographed by John Reeves. #ArtCanInstitute

While employed at the firm Graphic Associates, which made animated and commercial films, Wieland met fellow artist Michael Snow (b. Wieland and Snow in photographed by John Reeves.

Wieland, “Stuffed Movie,” 1966, Vancouver Art Gallery. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Stuffed Movie,” 1966, Vancouver Art Gallery. #ArtCanInstitute

During the 1960s Wieland also became more concerned with politics, nationalism, and activism. Joyce Wieland, Betsy Ross, “Look What They’ve Done to the Flag You Made with Such Care,” 1966, private collection. #ArtCanInstitute

During the 1960s Wieland also became more concerned with politics, nationalism, and activism. Joyce Wieland, Betsy Ross, “Look What They’ve Done to the Flag You Made with Such Care,” 1966, private collection. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland began an affiliation with the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto, a relationship that continued for many years. Invitation to Wieland: New Paintings at the Isaacs Gallery, Toronto, 1963. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland began an affiliation with the Isaacs Gallery in Toronto, a relationship that continued for many years. Invitation to Wieland: New Paintings at the Isaacs Gallery, Toronto,

Wieland, “Cooling Room No. 1,” 1964,  University of Lethbridge Art Collection. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Cooling Room No. University of Lethbridge Art Collection.

Wieland, “Cityscape,” 1960, Canada Council Art Bank. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Cityscape,” 1960, Canada Council Art Bank. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Heart On,” 1961, National Gallery of Canada. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Heart On,” National Gallery of Canada.

Wieland’s “The Battery,” (1963, private collection) refers to the neighbourhood at the southernmost tip of Manhattan, and though this artwork provides neither a conventional nor a realistic picture of the city, it is an unabashedly figurative painting. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland’s “The Battery,” private collection) refers to the neighbourhood at the southernmost tip of Manhattan, and though this artwork provides neither a conventional nor a realistic picture of the city, it is an unabashedly figurative painting.

Wieland continued to paint, at least in the early sixties, while opening up her art practice to encompass a range of new materials and media. Wieland in New York in 1964, photographed by John Reeves. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland continued to paint, at least in the early sixties, while opening up her art practice to encompass a range of new materials and media. Wieland in New York in photographed by John Reeves.

Wieland had learned filmmaking and animation techniques while working in the commercial-design milieu, so she was able to enter this field with confidence. “Water Sark,” 1965, National Gallery of Canada. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland had learned filmmaking and animation techniques while working in the commercial-design milieu, so she was able to enter this field with confidence. “Water Sark,” National Gallery of Canada.

In the late 1960s Wieland was initially swept up in Trudeaumania, the wave of excitement generated by Pierre Elliott Trudeau’s rise to power. Prime Minister Trudeau at the Liberal Leadership Convention in Ottawa in 1968. #ArtCanInstitute

In the late Wieland was initially swept up in Trudeaumania, the wave of excitement generated by Pierre Elliott Trudeau’s rise to power. Prime Minister Trudeau at the Liberal Leadership Convention in Ottawa in

Installation view of Joyce Wieland’s "Arctic Passion Cake," 1971, at the artist’s True Patriot Love exhibition, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. #ArtCanInstitute

Installation view of Joyce Wieland’s "Arctic Passion Cake," at the artist’s True Patriot Love exhibition, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

Wieland, “The Death of Wolfe,” 1987, private collection. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “The Death of Wolfe,” private collection.

Wieland returned to painting in the 1980s, often devising hallucinatory imagery concerned with sexuality and spirituality rather than overtly political questions. “Untitled (Woman and Fox),” 1986–88, estate of Joyce Wieland. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland returned to painting in the often devising hallucinatory imagery concerned with sexuality and spirituality rather than overtly political questions. “Untitled (Woman and Fox),” estate of Joyce Wieland.

Wieland, “Summer Blues—Ball,” 1961, Agnes Etherington Art Centre. #ArtCanInstitute

Wieland, “Summer Blues—Ball,” 1961, Agnes Etherington Art Centre. #ArtCanInstitute

Joyce Wieland, “Stranger in Town,” 1963, collection unknown. #ArtCanInstitute

Joyce Wieland, “Stranger in Town,” collection unknown.

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