Tom Thomson: Life & Work by David P. Silcox

Mysterious, brilliant, and prolific, in just five years Tom Thomson laid the foundation for the Group of Seven and shaped Canada’s cultural identity. Read and download the online art book here: http://www.aci-iac.ca/tom-thomson
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Thomson’s painting “The Rapids,” (1917, private collection) initially belonged to A.Y. Jackson. As he told his niece Dr. Naomi Groves Jackson, “He chose this work after Thomson’s death because he could never paint a river the way Thomson did.”

Tom Thomson is one of my favourite Canadian painters. He, along with his pals from the Group of Seven, revolutionized Canadian painting.Here's a great documentary on his life. West Wind The Vision of Tom Thomson

When it was too cold to camp out in his tent in Algonquin Park, Thomson often stayed at Mowat Lodge, where workers at the local lumber mill lived. Tom Thomson, “Mowat Lodge (or Fraser’s Lodge),” 1915, Art Gallery of Alberta.

When it was too cold to camp out in his tent in Algonquin Park, Thomson often stayed at Mowat Lodge, where workers at the local lumber mill lived. Tom Thomson, “Mowat Lodge (or Fraser’s Lodge),” Art Gallery of Alberta.

To earn needed money, Thomson sometimes worked as a guide or fire ranger in Algonquin Park. Tom Thomson at Tea Lake Dam, Algonquin Park, 1916.

To earn needed money, Thomson sometimes worked as a guide or fire ranger in Algonquin Park. Tom Thomson at Tea Lake Dam, Algonquin Park,

Thomson (back left) with his city visitors (left to right) F.H. Varley, A.Y. Jackson, and Arthur, Marjorie, and Esther Lismer in Algonquin Park, fall 1914.

Thomson (back left) with his city visitors (left to right) F.H. Varley, A.Y. Jackson, and Arthur, Marjorie, and Esther Lismer in Algonquin Park, fall 1914.

“Moonlight,” (1913–14, National Gallery of Canada) was the first of many works by Thomson that the National Gallery purchased, both during his life and later from his estate.

igormaglica: “ Tom Thomson Moonlight, oil on canvas, 53 x 77 cm ”

The cairn constructed in memory of Tom Thomson at Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. Photograph by J.E.H. MacDonald, September 1917.

The cairn constructed in memory of Tom Thomson at Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park.

The Thomson children, c. 1887. From left to right: Henry, Tom, Elizabeth, Minnie, Fraser, George, Margaret, Ralph, Louise.

The Thomson children, c. 1887. From left to right: Henry, Tom, Elizabeth, Minnie, Fraser, George, Margaret, Ralph, Louise.

A hand-tinted photo of the Thomson brothers, likely taken at the Seattle Engraving Company, c. 1902. From left to right: Henry, Tom, George, Ralph, and Fraser.

In unknown photo engraving studio, possibly Seattle Engraving Company.

Once Thomson left the commercial art room for the backwoods, his painting style loosened up dramatically. “Old Lumber Dam, Algonquin Park,” 1912, National Gallery of Canada.

Once Thomson left the commercial art room for the backwoods, his painting style loosened up dramatically. “Old Lumber Dam, Algonquin Park,” National Gallery of Canada.

Thomson’s shack, behind the Studio Building at 25 Severn Street, c. 1915, where he lived and painted during the last three winters of his life.

Thomson’s shack, behind the Studio Building at 25 Severn Street, c. where he lived and painted during the last three winters of his life.

Here in a few quick, expressive brush strokes, Thomson captures the melting ice and snow amid the promise of an early spring. “Spring Flood,” 1917, McMichael Canadian Art Collection.

Spring Flood Tom Thomson 1917 McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Canada) Painting - oil on board Height: cm in.), Width: cm in.

This photograph by Thomson, c. 1914, may have been of Winifred Trainor.

This photograph by Thomson, c. may have been of Winifred Trainor.

William Cruikshank, “Breaking a Road,” 1894, National Gallery of Canada.

William Cruikshank, “Breaking a Road,” National Gallery of Canada.

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