Halifax Explosion

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Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919 -- Firemen standing in thick molasses after the disaster. Muck drips off the ladder's rungs.

On This Day: The Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919

On January 15, 1919, in Boston's North End, a 50-foot-tall tank holding 2.3 million gallons of molasses burst, unleashing a deadly wave of molasses—reaching nearly 25 feet high at one point.

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Unique photographs taken by WWI sailor show the biggest manmade explosion in history when two warships crashed into each other

The photos taken by Royal Navy Lt Victor Magnus have emerged nearly 100 years after they were taken and show the moment a French and Norwegian ship collided during the 'Halifax Explosion'.

Vince Coleman (1)

Vince Coleman (1847 – December 6, 1917). Hero!

Vince Colemen (1874 – Dec. 6, 1917). Hero! The death toll of the Halifax Explosion on December 6, 1917 would have been higher if not for the efforts of a dispatcher with the Intercolonial Rai…

2nd Halifax Explosion at the Magazine Hill Ammo Depot, Jul 17, 1945

Halifax, Nova Scotia

2nd Halifax Explosion at the Magazine Hill Ammo Depot, Jul 17, 1945

Book of Remembrance for the Halifax Explosion. Almost 2000 people killed as a result of the blast.

Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance

The Remembrance Book contains a list of the 1,951 people identified as having perished as a direct result of the 1917 explosion. Beside the name of each victim is listed the age and local residential addresses at the time of the explosion, in addition to their burial sites.

On the morning of December 6, 1917, a Norwegian ship, the SS Imo, collided with the French munitions vessel, the SS Mont Blanc, in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Within 20 minutes, a fire spreading into the Mont Blanc's cargo of assorted ammunition ignited and exploded in what is regarded as the largest man-made pre-nuclear explosion in human history. An iron cannon from the Mont Blanc landed in a field nearly four miles away. A monument was created where the cannon fell.

On the morning of December 6, 1917, a Norwegian ship, the SS Imo, collided with the French munitions vessel, the SS Mont Blanc, in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Within 20 minutes, a fire spreading into the Mont Blanc's cargo of assorted ammunition ignited and exploded in what is regarded as the largest man-made pre-nuclear explosion in human history. An iron cannon from the Mont Blanc landed in a field nearly four miles away. A monument was created where the cannon fell.

Halifax Explosion December 6, 1917

Halifax Explosion December 6, 1917

(Halifax explosion)

The Great Halifax Explosion, Halifax Explosion, http://whitmania.com/pdpdpd/album/whitman_album.htm

he oldest building in Halifax, Saint Paul’s Church survived the explosion, but not without some damage. In fact, you can still see an iron spike that became embedded in the inner doorway of the church shortly after the explosion occurred, alongside a simple plaque that reads “A Relic of the Explosion.”

The Halifax Explosion Map | Ferries | Ferries

Learn more about one of the most unforgettable days in Maritime history with our handy map to important sites related to the Halifax Explosion.

Halifax City Hall is also a National Historic Site of Canada. It is home to a clock that is permanently set to 9:04 AM—the exact time the Halifax Explosion occurred 100 years ago. This clock can be viewed from Duke Street on the north face of Halifax City Hall.

The Halifax Explosion Map | Ferries | Ferries

Learn more about one of the most unforgettable days in Maritime history with our handy map to important sites related to the Halifax Explosion.

Explosion Map

Halifax Explosion Infosheet

IMO

Ships of the Halifax Explosion

IMO, after explosion Photo: MMA MP207.1.184/270, MP207.1.184/270a,M90.61.15

map of halifax harbour and bedford basin 1917 - Yahoo Canada Image Search Results

map of halifax harbour and bedford basin 1917

Halifax Explosion Memorial

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On the cool clear morning of December 6, 1917, the munitions ship Mont Blanc, already on fire from a collision in HalifaxHarbour with the Belgian relief ship Imo, glances off pier 6 in the north end of

Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919 -- Firemen standing in thick molasses after the disaster. Muck drips off the ladder's rungs.

On This Day: The Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919

On January 15, 1919, in Boston's North End, a 50-foot-tall tank holding 2.3 million gallons of molasses burst, unleashing a deadly wave of molasses—reaching nearly 25 feet high at one point.

Halifax Explosion - YouTube (Today is the 97th anniversary) Dec.6th,1917

Halifax Explosion

facts about the Halifax Explosion, made for a class project Music: "What I've Done" by Linkin Park Disclaimer: I own no part of the video clips or photograph...

Halifax explosion - Nova Scotia - Building with walls bent outward and floor collapsing  www.lightfortysix.com

Halifax explosion - Nova Scotia - Building with walls bent outward and floor collapsing www.lightfortysix.com