Karla Briggs

Karla Briggs

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Karla Briggs
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Scientists reveal the surprising genetic identity of early human remains from roughly 400,000 years ago in Spain (Atapuerca). New tests on human bones hidden in a Spanish cave for some 400,000 years set a new record for the oldest human DNA sequence ever decoded—and may scramble the scientific picture of our early relatives. The bones were first thought to belong to European Neanderthals, but analysis showed they are genetically closer to the Siberian Denisovans.

Scientists reveal the surprising genetic identity of early human remains from roughly years ago in Spain (Atapuerca). New tests on human bones hidden in a Spanish cave for some years set a new record for.

Though the use of a tree as a metaphor for understanding the relationships between organisms is often attributed to Darwin, who articulated it in his Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection in 1859, the concept, most recently appropriated in mapping systems and knowledge networks, is actually much older, predating the theory of evolution itself.

The frontispiece of William King Gregory’s two-volume Evolution Emerging. Gregory, Evolution Emerging: A Survey of Changing Patterns from Primeval Life to Man, vol. courtesy of Mary DeJong, Mai Qaraman, and the American Museum of Natural History.

Meet "Wilma," the first reconstruction of a Neanderthal created using evidence from fossil anatomy and ancient DNA (for the October 2008 cover story for National Geographic). Click through for the article and more photos.

Evolution the Human Story

These images are merely intended to be reasonable artist renderings based on available evidence, understanding that evidence regarding skin color, hair, and other characteristics are limited. - The Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science

Map of Human Migration

Human Migration Map 'A-Walk-Through-Time' - This map visualizes the estimated timeline of early human migration out of our ancestral African “Eden” and across the globe.

Scientists reveal the surprising genetic identity of early human remains from roughly 400,000 years ago in Spain (Atapuerca). New tests on human bones hidden in a Spanish cave for some 400,000 years set a new record for the oldest human DNA sequence ever decoded—and may scramble the scientific picture of our early relatives. The bones were first thought to belong to European Neanderthals, but analysis showed they are genetically closer to the Siberian Denisovans.

Scientists reveal the surprising genetic identity of early human remains from roughly years ago in Spain (Atapuerca). New tests on human bones hidden in a Spanish cave for some years set a new record for.

Human fossils hint at new species    The bones, which represent at least five individuals, have been dated to between 11,500 and 14,500 years ago.    In general, the individuals had rounded brain cases with prominent brow ridges. Their skull bones were quite thick. Their faces were quite short and flat and tucked under the brain, and they had broad noses.

A skull from a possibly new species of human (currently known as the 'Red Deer Cave people') recovered from Longlin cave in Guangxi province, China.

Though the use of a tree as a metaphor for understanding the relationships between organisms is often attributed to Darwin, who articulated it in his Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection in 1859, the concept, most recently appropriated in mapping systems and knowledge networks, is actually much older, predating the theory of evolution itself.

The frontispiece of William King Gregory’s two-volume Evolution Emerging. Gregory, Evolution Emerging: A Survey of Changing Patterns from Primeval Life to Man, vol. courtesy of Mary DeJong, Mai Qaraman, and the American Museum of Natural History.