#6 Immigrants for Opportunities: The Chinese Exclusion Act, signed in 1882 by President Chester A. Arthur. was the first law to restrict immigration into the United States. It stopped Chinese from immigrating to the US and prevented them from becoming US citizens.

Type of source: Chinese children Date or This picture has to do with the Chinese exclusion act when Canada didn't let any Chinese in unless they were students, or doing business. The Chinese call July the "Humiliation day.

#5 Working Conditions: “Food––Hawaii—Canning. Native girls packing pineapple into cans”  By Edgeworth, taken for the Katakura & Company, November 20, 1928  Hawaiian pineapple canneries often employed Japanese or Filipino immigrants who worked seasonally. During the summers, when the pineapples were ripening, canneries ran two or three shifts.

Hawaiian girls in a pineapple cannery - November 20 1928 -Records of the Women’s Bureau - National Archives

#2 Colonial Subjects: Fil-Am Experiences 1930-1945: Filipino Immigrants and The Great Depression

A Great Depression sign in the A lot of economic problems in the Due to the Great Depression people were moving cross the country in order to find work. It was the longest depression ever.

#9 Strikes: On June 25, 1867, thousands of Chinese railroad workers staged a strike to demand equal pay to white laborers, shorter workdays, and better conditions.

On June thousands of Chinese railroad workers staged a strike to demand equal pay to white laborers, shorter workdays, and better conditions.

#8 Second Generation: SHAWN WONG Second generation Chinese American Shawn Wong. My mother would wear Chinese dresses, cheong sams, says Wong in the documentary. My mother and father would speak Chinese to each other at home, and, and here I am, this little boy. I wanted to be, you know, Willie Mays. I wanted to be Roy Rogers.

#8 Second Generation: SHAWN WONG Second generation Chinese American Shawn Wong. My mother would wear Chinese dresses, cheong sams, says Wong in the documentary. My mother and father would speak Chinese to each other at home, and, and here I am, this little boy. I wanted to be, you know, Willie Mays. I wanted to be Roy Rogers.

#4 2nd Generation: Bridge Generation young men posing at a wedding reception in Livingston in 1954.  Note the band members on break in the background, also BG contemporaries, who provided swing/jazz music for dancing. (Photo courtesy of Peter Jamero)

An Invisible Generation

Bridge Generation young men posing at a wedding reception in Livingston in Note the band members on break in the background, also BG contemporaries, who provided swing/jazz music for dancing. (Photo courtesy of Peter Jamero)

Module 3 Pinterest Project Filipino vs Chinese Americans

Module 3 Pinterest Project Filipino vs Chinese Americans

#3 Strikes: Remembering the Manongs and Story of the Filipino Farm Worker Movement

Remembering the Manongs and Story of the Filipino Farm Worker Movement


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