Emily Carr in her caravan-It is not all bad, this getting old, ripening. After the fruit has got its growth it should juice up and mellow. God forbid I should live long enough to ferment and rot and fall to the ground in a squash. (Emily Carr)

Emily Carr (Born Dec 1871 Victoria, BC- was a Canadian artist and writer heavily inspired by the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

short film - Famous BC people - Emily Carr

A story about Emily Carr, the Famous BC Artist

Emily (Millie) and her brother Dick Carr, 1889 or 1890

jpg is Richard (Dick)

Emily Carr and Friends, a sculpture by Joe Fafard located beside the Heffel Gallery on South Granville in Vancouver, BC

Emily Carr and Friends, a sculpture by Joe Fafard located beside the Heffel Gallery on South Granville in Vancouver, BC 2007

Emily Carr Quote ~ God - Quotes by Women

Emily Carr Quote ~ God

Emily Carr Quote "Art is an aspect of God and there is only one God, but different people see him in different ways." Art by Emily Carr.

"Sky" by Emily Carr, 1935-1936. Oil on wove paper. National Gallery of Canada, purchased 1937.

"Sky" by Emily Carr, Oil on wove paper. National Gallery of Canada, purchased

Studio portrait of Emily Carr and her sisters. Clockwise from left: Lizzie, Edith, Clara, Emily, and Alice. Photograph by Skene Lowe, c. 1895.

Emily Carr and her sisters. Clockwise from left: Lizzie, Edith, Clara, Emily, and Alice

Emily Carr: Representing and Othering Natives, NW 1st Nation Artist

Emily Carr in Cape & tam

The House of All Sorts, Emily Carr

The House of All Sorts, Emily Carr

Alice Carr, 1909. Emily Carr

Emily Carr Alice Carr, Alice, Emily's schoolteacher sister, was her favourite, according to Doris Shadbolt's book.

Statue of Emily Carr outside the landmark Empress Hotel Emily seen with her monkey Woo on her shoulder and her dog Billie.

Statue of Emily Carr outside the landmark Empress Hotel Emily seen with her monkey Woo on her shoulder and her dog Billie.

Emily Carr and some of her companion animals, including Woo the monkey, Victoria, 1940

Emily Carr and some of her companion animals, including Woo the monkey, Victoria, 1940

Emily Carr’s father encouraged her independence and spirit. At the same time his authoritarianism and sternness led to her early sense of alienation and rebellion. Studio portrait of Carr’s parents, Emily Carr (née Saunders) and Richard Carr, c. 1876.

Emily Carr’s father encouraged her independence and spirit. At the same time his authoritarianism and sternness led to her early sense of alienation and rebellion. Studio portrait of Carr’s parents, Emily Carr (née Saunders) and Richard Carr, c.

After 1937, when Emily Carr’s health made painting difficult for her, she turned mainly to writing, producing a series of books. Harold Mortimer-Lamb, “Emily Carr in Her Studio,” 1939, Vancouver Art Gallery.

After when Emily Carr’s health made painting difficult for her, she turned mainly to writing, producing a series of books. Harold Mortimer-Lamb, “Emily Carr in Her Studio,” Vancouver Art Gallery.

Emily Carr captured the wild landscapes and seascapes of early British Columbia in paintings so vivid you can almost hear them

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