'Viola Davis Desmond (1914 –1965) was an Black Nova Scotian and  A successful businesswoman and beautician in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Viola Desmond is often described as Canada’s Rosa Parks since on November 8, 1946 she refused to sit in the balcony designated exclusively for blacks in the Roseland Theatre.

In entrepreneur Viola Desmond refused to leave a whites-only area of the Roseland Theatre and was unjustly convicted of a tax violation used to.

“Never retreat, never explain, never apologize. Get the thing done and let them howl.”     Nellie McClung

Nellie McClung "Never underestimate the power of woman" Nellie McClung was a Canadian feminist, politician, and social activist. She was a part of the social and moral reform movements prevalent in Western Canada in the early

By the end of World War II, 4,480 Canadian Nursing Sisters served in the military, with 3,656 in the army, 481 with the air force, and 343 with the navy. #ww2 #cdnhistory

Canada’s WW2 Nursing Sisters

Women in WWII - By the end of World War II, Canadian Nursing Sisters served in the military, with in the army, 481 with the air force, and 343 with the navy.

“My career has been one of much struggle characterized by the usual persecution which attends everyone who pioneers a new movement or steps out of line with established custom.” - Dr. Emily Stowe

Spotlight: Dr. Emily Stowe

“Nursing Sister’s Apron, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps (RCAMC).” This uniform belonged to Nursing Sister Miriam Hartrick who served in England, France, and Italy. #ww2 #cdnhstory

Canada’s WW2 Nursing Sisters

“Nursing Sister’s Apron, Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps (RCAMC).” This uniform belonged to Nursing Sister Miriam Hartrick who served in England, France, and Italy.

Nursing Sister Margaret Brooke, a dietitian at the Royal Canadian Naval Hospital, St. John’s, Newfoundland, 17 July 1943. Click the link to read about her bad ass story. #ww2 #cdnhistory

Canada’s WW2 Nursing Sisters

Nursing Sister Margaret Brooke, a dietitian at the Royal Canadian Naval Hospital, St. John’s, Newfoundland, 17 July Click the link to read about her bad ass story.

“Cpl. Bill Kay Strolls with Nursing Sister Dorothy Rapsey.” [Source] The uniform for North Africa was the same color as soldiers’ were and consisted of a beige short sleeved dress that ended just below the knee, a beige veil, black stockings and shoes. Their brown belt is the same as the one seen in the Bluebirds uniform. #ww2 #cdnhistory

Canada’s WW2 Nursing Sisters

Canadian+Soldiers+in+The+World+War+II Cpl. Bill Kay strolls with nursing sister Dorothy Rapsey.

Private F. Madore with Nursing Sister M.F. Giles waiting for an air-evacuation from an R.C.A.F. Spitfire base, Normandy, France, 16 June 1944. #ww2 #cdnhistory

Canada’s WW2 Nursing Sisters

Private F. Madore with Nursing Sister M. Giles waiting for an air-evacuation from an R.

Dr. Emily Stowe was a bad ass.

Spotlight: Dr. Emily Stowe

Emily Howard Stowe was pretty awesome. Born on May 1831 in Norwich, Ontario, Emily became not only the first female doctor* to openly practice in Canada, but she was also the first female pu…

French Canadian Lady in her winter dress and a Roman Catholic Priest by John Lambert (1816) #lowerclassfashion #regency

Women’s Fashion During the Regency Era (1810s to 1830s)

French Canadian Lady in her winter dress and a Roman Catholic Priest by John Lambert

Dress, Canadian (c. 1823-1825). A old rose silk taffeta and beige silk satin gown with a cotton lining. Sewn by hand. [Source: McCord Museum] #regency #historicalfashion

Women’s Fashion During the Regency Era (1810s to 1830s)

Dress, Canadian (c. A old rose silk taffeta and beige silk satin gown with a cotton lining. Sewn by hand.

19th century portrait of Mary Henry [Laura Secord Homestead Museum, Queenston, (Source: Kelsie Brewer)].   Here’s the story of Mary Henry; an all-but-forgotten heroine from the War of 1812. There is not a lot of source material on her and sadly the above portrait is the only image we have of her, but Mary’s story is an example of the extraordinary things ordinary citizens do during times of war.

Spotlight: Mary Henry

19th century portrait of Mary Henry [Laura Secord Homestead Museum, Queenston, (Source: Kelsie Brewer)]. Here’s the story of Mary Henry; an all-but-forgotten heroine from the War of 1812. There is not a lot of source material on her and sadly the above portrait is the only image we have of her, but Mary’s story is an example of the extraordinary things ordinary citizens do during times of war.

Women and the #klondike #goldrush

The Klondike Gold Rush

A group of actresses crosses the Dyea River in Alaska heading for one of the new boom towns. The larger settlements featured theaters that usually played to large male audiences hungry for entertainment.

Full outfit, Europe. To the right, a cotton plain weave (muslin) dress with cutwork and cotton embroidery. To the left, a cotton chemise, corset, sleeve plumpers, and a corded petticoat. [Source: LACMA] #1830s #historicalfashion

Women’s Fashion During the Regency Era (1810s to 1830s)

Full outfit, Europe. To the right, a cotton plain weave (muslin) dress with cutwork and cotton embroidery. To the left, a cotton chemise, corset, sleeve plumpers, and a corded petticoat. [Source: LACMA] #1830s #historicalfashion

Nursing Sisters compete in an egg and spoon race. (Dominion Day - July 1, 1917). #WW1

1917 Vs. 2017

Nursing Sisters compete in an egg and spoon race.

One time while helping with an operation, the surgeon was shot dead right in the middle of it. Did she panic? Nope. Morkin jumped in and finished the operation so that the patient would not die as well. #ww1 #cdnhist #badass

Veterans’ Stories: Morkin and Strachan

One time while helping with an operation, the surgeon was shot dead right in the middle of it. Did she panic? Morkin jumped in and finished the operation so that the patient would not die as well.

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