Handley Page Halifax Bomber...Squadron 431 went missing June 16, 1944. My Papa made it home after 275 days as a P.O.W

Handley Page 'Halifax' bombers were flown by many Canadian pilots and crews in WWII - one of my relatives was one of them - he was a gunner on the top turret.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - With its new infrastructure up and running, 10 Squadron, like many Yorkshire-based units, re-equipped with the Handley Page Halifax and soon launched raids deep into the heart of Nazi Germany.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - Page 3 of 5 - Urban Ghosts Media

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - In 1941 No. 405 Squadron RCAF took up residency at the base, losing 20 Wellingtons on 84 bombing raids over an 11 month period. In April the following year the Canadian squadron converted onto Halifax and flew an additional 20 missions before moving to RAF Topcliffe. In turn, Topcliffe’s 102 Squadron RAF relocated to Pocklington and remained there until the end of the war.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

Armourers 'bombing up' a Handley Page Halifax Mk II of No. 405 Squadron RCAF at Pocklington in Yorkshire, August Forward (F/O)

RCAF 432 Squadron Halifax bomber, “Q for Queenie”. (Photo courtesy of Manuel Sharko)

RCAF 432 Squadron Halifax bomber, “Q for Queenie”. (Photo courtesy of Manuel Sharko)

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - Of the 6,176 Halifax bombers built during the Second World War, Elvington’s Halifax is one of only two (restored) surviving examples of the heavy bomber workhorse left in the world, the other in Canada. (Another Yorkshire Halifax, a Mk.II serial number W1048, which crash landed in April 1942 during an attack on the German battleship Tirpitz and was recovered from a Norwegian fjord in 1973.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - Not far from RAF Breighton, amid farmland just south of Selby, lies RAF Burn, a North Yorkshire heavy bomber base which opened in 1942 and, like so many World War Two airfields, remained in use for just four years. During its short operational life Burn was home to the Vickers Wellingtons of No. 431 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, which later relocated to the No. 6 Group RCAF’s base at Tholthorpe near Easingwold.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

The countryside of North and East Yorkshire, UK, is home to dozens of abandoned Bomber Command airfields, many of them once operated by No.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

Halifax B Mark II Series 1 (Special), KN-X’, of No. 77 Squadron RAF, making a low level pass over other aircraft of the squadron at Elvington, Yorkshire.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command - When it opened, RAF Topcliffe was home to the Whitley bombers of 77 and 102 Squadrons, and later the Wellingtons and Halifaxes of 419 and 424 Squadrons (RCAF). Construction began in 1939 and featured a decoy site at Raskelf. But by early January 1943 the former 4 Group facility had been transferred to the charge of No. 6 Group RCAF.

The Forgotten Yorkshire Airfields of No. 4 Group, Bomber Command

Whitley Mk V, of 102 Squadron at Topcliffe, Yorkshire. It failed to return from a bombing raid on Cologne on the night of March 1941

Pinterest
Search

Unlimited free access to the world's best ideas

Sign up to see more

OR

By continuing, you agree to Pinterest's Terms of Service, Privacy Policy
Pinterest helps you find ideas to try.