Royal Tyrell Museum-This is one of the most treasured skeletons in the World.  It is a giant fish  who had just swallowed another fish.  Both skeletons are clearly visible

Royal Tyrell Museum -This is one of the most treasured skeletons in the World. It is a giant fish who had just swallowed another fish. Both skeletons are clearly visible

Chasmosaurus | Flickr - Photo Sharing!  :Chasmosaurus  The first recognized skeleton of Chasmosaurus was named by Lawrence Lambe in 1914. The large skin-covered openings, or chasms, in the frill of this dinosaur would have made the frill too fragile to use in defence. Chasmosaurus is the only chasmosaurine with small, backwardly curving orbital horns.   This dinosaur is from the Late Cretaceous, 75 to 74.5 million years ago in the Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta:

Chasmosaurus | Flickr - Photo Sharing! :Chasmosaurus The first recognized skeleton of Chasmosaurus was named by Lawrence Lambe in 1914. The large skin-covered openings, or chasms, in the frill of this dinosaur would have made the frill too fragile to use in defence. Chasmosaurus is the only chasmosaurine with small, backwardly curving orbital horns. This dinosaur is from the Late Cretaceous, 75 to 74.5 million years ago in the Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta:

Chasmosaurus (/ˌkæzmɵˈsɔrəs/ kaz-mo-sawr-əs) is a genus of ceratopsid dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Period of North America. Its name means 'opening lizard', referring to the large openings (fenestrae) in its frill (Greek chasma meaning 'opening' or 'hollow' or 'gulf' and sauros meaning 'lizard'). With a length of 4–5 metres (13–16 ft) and a weight of 2 tonnes (2.2 short tons), Chasmosaurus was a ceratopsian of average size. Like all ceratopsians, it was purely herbivorous.

Chasmosaurus belli ROM Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology. Late Cretaceous million years ago. Found at Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, and prepared at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology, Drumheller, Alberta. (CC BY SA

Camp like the cowboys but do it in style. Glamping is the way to go at Dinosaur Provincial Park. Explore the badlands and fossils all day and then relax in luxury at your own private tent.

Glamping with the Dinosaurs

Everyone gives glamping (camping with comfort) a hard time. They think that if you are not camping properly, you are not camping at all. We disagree.

Dinosaur Provincial Park poster

supersonicart: “Cameron Stevens on epic illustrations of National Parks, Provincial Parks and other world wonders by Cameron Stevens are available as art prints and other items in his.

Dinosaur fossils, Dinosaur Provincial Park. Alberta, Canada (color)

One of the world’s richest dinosaur fossil fields is in Alberta’s badlands, and archaeological excavations continue to take place there. The area has been designated as a provincial park (Dinosaur Provincial Park) and an UNESCO World Heritage site.

comfort camping in Alberta

Menu Plan Monday ~ August 6/12 -

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