Week Indigenous Stories Pauline's Pick: Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story

October 20, 2016. Amik loves school: a story of wisdom - by Katherena Vermette, illustrated by Irene Kuziw. Amik tells his grandfater about his school. Then his grandfather tells Amik about the residential school he went to. Amik decides to show his grandfather how different his school is.

Amik Loves School: A Story of Wisdom by Katherena Vermette (A) & Irene Kuziw (I)

Kookum's Red Shoes - by Peter Eyvindson, illustrated by Sheldon Dawson. Kookum remembers the experiences in her youth that changed her life forever, and we see what was lost in her life, and how goodness persisted.

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

Shi-Shi-Etko - by Nicola I. Campbell, pictures by Kim La Fave.  In just four days young Shi-shi-etko will have to leave her family and all that she knows to attend residential school. She spends her last days at home treasuring the beauty of her world - the dancing sunlight, the tall grass, each shiny rock, the tadpoles in the creek, her grandfather's paddle song. Her mother, father and grandmother, each in turn, share valuable teachings that they want her to remember.

Shi-shi-etko gathers together many of the things of nature and places them into her bag of memories so that she will never forget her people and land as she prepares to go many miles away to the required residential school.

Sammy Goes to Residential School - by Mary Lingman, illustrations by Susan Ross. Sammy is a seven-year-old Cree boy who has to go to residential school away from his family and the reserve because his parents spend the year on the trapline until spring. Sammy is unhappy about leaving his family, and the preparations are an ordeal—having his grandmother cut his hair short with a big scissors, and being scrubbed all over by his mother. But worse things happened when he got to school.

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

Red Wolf - by Jennifer Dance. Life is changing for Canada's Anishnaabek Nation and for the wolf packs that share their territory.In the late 1800s, both Native people and wolves are being forced from the land. Starving and lonely, an orphaned timber wolf is befriended by a boy named Red Wolf. But under the Indian Act, Red Wolf is forced to attend a residential school far from the life he knows, and the wolf is alone once more.

Dance tells the story of Red Wolf, a five-year-old boy who is removed from his family at the age of five to attend residential school.

No Time to Say Goodbye: Children's Stories of Kuper Island Residential School - Sylvia Olsen, with Rita Morris and Ann Sam. No Time to Say Goodbye is a fictional account of five children sent to aboriginal boarding school, based on the recollections of a number of Tsartlip First Nations people. These unforgettable children are taken by government agents from Tsartlip Day School to live at Kupar Island Residential School.

Children's stories of Kuper Island Residential School **Sylvia Olsen with Rita Morris and Ann Sam**

"Mush-Hole": Memories of a Residential School - as told by Maddie Harper, art by Carlos Freire.

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

A Stranger at Home - by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, artwork by Liz Amini-Holmes. Looks at the experiences of a young Inuit girl returning from a residential religious school, where she is not recognized by her mother and is seen as an outsider.

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

A is for Assimilation: the ABC's of Canada's Aboriginal People and Residential Schools - by Len Fortune.  "A is for Assimilation, althought blunt in its approach, is aimed at teens and anyone who isn't familiar with the basic history of the nation's First People."

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

When I Was Eight - by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, art by Gabrielle Grimard. This book chronicles the unbreakable spirit of an Inuit girl while attending an Arctic residential school.

Research Guides: Social Justice Teaching & Topics : Residential Schools

Not My Girl - by Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, art by Gabrielle Grimard. Two years ago, Margaret left her Arctic home for the outsiders' school. Now she has returned and can barely contain her excitement as she rushes towards her waiting family -- but her mother stands still as a stone. This strange, skinny child, with her hair cropped short, can't be her daughter. "Not my girl!" she says angrily. Her only comfort is in the books she learned to read at school.

- Read Amazing Children's Books - Unlimited Library Including Flat Stanley, Scaredy Squirrel, Batman, and Many Others

Fatty Legs: a True Story - by Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, artwork from Liz Amini-Holmes. When Margaret Pokiak was very young she traveled with her father from her home in the High Arctic to Aklavik. The Inuit girl was mesmerized by what she saw there--strange dark-cloaked nuns and pale-skinned priests who had journeyed from far-off lands. Margaret knew they held the key to the greatest of the outsiders mysteries--reading

"Fatty Legs: A True Story" by Christy Jordon-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton - shortlisted for the 2011 Sheila A.

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