On this day in history In the spring of 1963, activists in Birmingham, Alabama launched one of the most influential campaigns of the Civil R...

On this day in history In the spring of activists in Birmingham, Alabama launched one of the most influential campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement: Project C, better known as The Birmingham Campaign.

Birmingham Campaign of 1963 | Encyclopedia of Alabama

May Youths are pummeled by water from a fire hose during a Children's Crusade demonstration in downtown Birmingham.

On May 10, 1963 after months of protest and negotiation, a council representing businesses in downtown Birmingham reached an agreement with Martin Luther King, Jr. and the SCLC. The council agreed to desegregate and hire black clerical workers and sales associates. #TodayInBlackHistory

Less than 50 years ago people: Charles Moore, Alabama Fire Department aims high-pressure water hoses at civil rights demonstrators, Birmingham protests, 1963

African American children are attacked by dogs and water cannons during the 1963 Birmingham Campaign, a protest against segregation. (photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

May The Birmingham Campaign’s Children’s Crusade Begins On this day in the Children’s Crusade began as hundreds of students walked out of their classrooms to peacefully protest.

The Letter from Birmingham Jail, composed by Martin Luther King, Jr from his cell in the Birmingham City Jail and dated April 16, 1963, was a seminal document that established the moral foundations for the non-violent civil rights demonstrations of the Birmingham campaign.  http://abacus.bates.edu/admin/offices/dos/mlk/letter.html

'Letter from Birmingham Jail', composed by MLK, Jr from his cell in the jail, dated was a seminal document that established the moral foundation for the non-violent civil rights demonstrations of the Birmingham campaign.

On this day in history In the spring of 1963, activists in Birmingham, Alabama launched one of the most influential campaigns of the Civil R...

Singer Dick Gregory (with "Everybody wants Freedom" sign) leads demonstrators to jail while police control the scene in Birmingham, Alabama, May 1963 Photo credit: NY Daily News

POLICE DOG ATTACK    Police K-9 units were deployed to manage crowds of protesters during the Birmingham Campaign of the civil rights movement in May 1963. Such actions brought massive negative publicity to the city in the national media.

On this day in history In the spring of activists in Birmingham, Alabama launched one of the most influential campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement: Project C, better known as The Birmingham Campaign.

Bill Hudson's image of Parker High School student Walter Gadsden being attacked by dogs was published in The New York Times on May 4, 1963.

Uncredited Photographer Old Civil Rights Demonstrator is Attacked by Cops and Police Dogs, Birmingham, Alabama 1963

On April 10, 1963, Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety Bull Connor obtained an injunction barring civil rights protests and raising bond for those arrested from $300 to $1200. At a mass meeting that evening at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, SCLC organizer Rev. Ralph Abernathy said "The eyes of the world are on Birmingham tonight.... Are you ready, are you ready to make the challenge? I am ready to go to jail, are you?" #TodayInBlackHistory

Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King led a non-violent protest against racial segregation that landed him in the Birmingham City Jail. At the time, Birmingham was one of the mos.

A black and white photograph of a suburban house with minor bomb damage to the roof and two windows while five black Birmingham residents stare at the damage; the yard is cordoned off with a sign saying "Danger Keep Out"

[Group of African Americans viewing the bomb-damaged home of Arthur Shores, NAACP attorney, Birmingham, Alabama]

1963 | The Civil Rights Movement reached a crescendo in 1963, as marchers braved fire hoses, police dogs, vitriol, and violence to demonstrate against segregation in Birmingham, Alabama. The Ku Klux Klan retaliated by bombing the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young girls in the process. The reaction transformed the movement into a national cause and led to the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

"Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will., "Letter from Birmingham Jail," April 1963

May 1963 — The Birmingham campaign

The 50 Most Powerful Pictures In American History

Ullman High School student Walter Gadsden, being attacked by police dogs during civil rights protests, 1963

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