This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera. the photograph was shot from roughly 7 miles away during the Tumbler-Snapper tests in Nevada (1952). The fireball is roughly 20 meters in diameter, and 3x hotter than the surface of the sun.

Photo of a Nuclear Explosion Less than 1 Millisecond After Detonation

Nuclear explosion photographed less than one millisecond after detonation. From the Tumbler-Snapper test series in Nevada, showing fireball and "rope trick" effects. The fireball is about 20 meters in diameter in this shot.

Atomic Bomb detonation Photos by Harold Edgerton. Automatic Camera situated 7 miles from blast with 10 foot lens. Shutter speed equaled 1/100,000,000 of-a-second exposure.

Atomic blast shot by Harold ‘Doc’ Edgerton in 1952 through his Rapatronic (Rapid Action Electronic) Camera. of a second exposure

http://petapixel.com/2014/03/05/rapatronic-camera-atomic-blast-captured-11000000000th-second/

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

These are photographs of the first few milliseconds of nuclear explosions. They lead scientists to several new discoveries as to how nuclear bombs worked. But how do you capture the first millisecond of a nuclear bomb? With several rapatronic cameras, a Kerr cell, and a little physics.

The camera that captured the first millisecond of a nuclear bomb blast

These are photographs of the first few milliseconds of nuclear explosions. They lead scientists to several new discoveries as to how nuclear bombs worked. But how do you capture the first millisecond of a nuclear bomb? With several rapatronic cameras, a Kerr cell, and a little physics.

This is 1/100,000,000th of a second after the first photo. See those little horns coming out the bottom? That’s lightning bolting down the tension wires of the now engulfed tower created by the force of karate-chopped atoms.

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

Super-duper high speed photography (we're talking ten millionth of a sec) of the birth of a Hiroshima size atomic blast. Top photo the .

Damn Interesting: Rapatronic Nuclear Photographs

During the early days of atomic bomb experiments in the nuclear weapons scientists had some difficulty studying the growth of nuclear fireballs in t

Nuclear explosion captured by Harold "Doc" Edgerton's Rapatronic camera.

Nuclear explosion photographed less than one millisecond after detonation. From the Tumbler-Snapper test series in Nevada, showing fireball and "rope trick" effects. The fireball is about 20 meters in diameter in this shot.

Nuclear test Plumbbob Whitney | 1957 | An electrical discharge caused by the ionization of air. | Rapatronic camera photo

Nuclear test Plumbbob Whitney, An electrical discharge caused by the ionization of air is visible in this Rapatronic camera photo.

Rapatronic Camera Pictures - Imgur

Rapatronic Camera Pictures

Rapatronic Camera Pictures - Imgur

Rapatronic Camera Pictures

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High-speed rapatronic camera, manufactured by Edgerton, Germeshausen and Grier Inc. Boston. Took the first pictures of nuclear explosions.

It's The Bomb! Vintage Explosion Photos

High-speed rapatronic camera, manufactured by Edgerton, Germeshausen and Grier Inc. Took the first pictures of nuclear explosions.

Nuclear detonation photographed by a Rapatronic camera less than 1 millisecond after detonation.

Harold Edgerton, Nuclear explosion photographed with a Rapatronic Camera 1 millisecond after detonation,

"THE SWING MASTER"The rapatronic camera is a high-speed camera capable of recording a still image with an exposure time as brief as 10 nanoseconds (billionths of a second).

"THE SWING MASTER"The rapatronic camera is a high-speed camera capable of recording a still image with an exposure time as brief as 10 nanoseconds (billionths of a second).

Rapatronic Camera Pictures - Album on Imgur

Rapatronic Camera Pictures

The explosion of Boltzmann K) during Operation Plumbbomb.

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