Basal Rosette Of Daisy Fleabane (erigeron annuus): Daisy fleabane is a delicate wildflower. Each plant has several composite flowers that look typically daisy-like, having a yellow central disk surrounded by white, petal-like rays. Composite flowers are positioned singularly atop the terminal shoot of downy stems. The leaves are also hairy, lanceolate, and coarsely toothed.

Basal Rosette Of Daisy Fleabane (erigeron annuus): Daisy fleabane is a delicate wildflower. Each plant has several composite flowers that look typically daisy-like, having a yellow central disk surrounded by white, petal-like rays. Composite flowers are positioned singularly atop the terminal shoot of downy stems. The leaves are also hairy, lanceolate, and coarsely toothed.

Leopards Bane (doronicum cordatum): This a perennial that flowers in the early spring and then goes dormant. It will grow in sun or shade. Doronicum grows as a foot-wide clump and produces yellow daisies that rise well above the toothed leaves, which clasp the stems. Although it spreads prolifically, it doesn't really become a pest because the foliage dies back in early summer.

Leopards Bane (doronicum cordatum): This a perennial that flowers in the early spring and then goes dormant. It will grow in sun or shade. Doronicum grows as a foot-wide clump and produces yellow daisies that rise well above the toothed leaves, which clasp the stems. Although it spreads prolifically, it doesn't really become a pest because the foliage dies back in early summer.

Staghorn Sumac (rhus typhina): A hardy deciduous species with colorful fruit and bright orange fall color. Flowers are followed (on females) by red berries in cone-shaped structures. It grows best in full sun and is quite drought tolerant. Aggressive growth habit, spreading by runners. It can reach up to 15ft (5m) or more. Native to Eastern North America.

Staghorn Sumac (rhus typhina): A hardy deciduous species with colorful fruit and bright orange fall color. Flowers are followed (on females) by red berries in cone-shaped structures. It grows best in full sun and is quite drought tolerant. Aggressive growth habit, spreading by runners. It can reach up to 15ft (5m) or more. Native to Eastern North America.

Gloriosa Daisy (rudbeckia hirta): Your plant appears to be a gloriosa daisy, aka Rudbeckia hirta. Although this plant is actually a biennial (it grows one year, blooms the next and then it dies) it is also grown as an annual in many gardens. There are many varieties of gloriosa daisy, and it's impossible to say which one this is. They are easy to grow from seed and do best in full sun and well-drained soils. Where they are happy they often self-seed, so if you grow them learn to distinguish…

Gloriosa Daisy (rudbeckia hirta): Your plant appears to be a gloriosa daisy, aka Rudbeckia hirta. Although this plant is actually a biennial (it grows one year, blooms the next and then it dies) it is also grown as an annual in many gardens. There are many varieties of gloriosa daisy, and it's impossible to say which one this is. They are easy to grow from seed and do best in full sun and well-drained soils. Where they are happy they often self-seed, so if you grow them learn to distinguish…

Daylily Cultivar (hemerocallis): This is a daylily although it's impossible for us to tell which one. There are thousands of varieties of daylilies in colors ranging from white to red and any number of yellows and oranges in between. They grow best in full sun and flower in mid to late summer.

Daylily Cultivar (hemerocallis): This is a daylily although it's impossible for us to tell which one. There are thousands of varieties of daylilies in colors ranging from white to red and any number of yellows and oranges in between. They grow best in full sun and flower in mid to late summer.

Jewelweed (impatiens capensis): Your photo is blurry so it's hard to be sure, but this may be jewelweed, a wildflower/weed that grows in shade to part shade and moist soils  It's a relative of the garden impatiens.  It's often found growing near poison ivy and some people use the smushed stems of jewel weed to ease the itch of poison ivy.  It produces orange or yellow flowers later in summer.  Please send a clear in-focus photo and we'll confirm.

Jewelweed (impatiens capensis): Your photo is blurry so it's hard to be sure, but this may be jewelweed, a wildflower/weed that grows in shade to part shade and moist soils It's a relative of the garden impatiens. It's often found growing near poison ivy and some people use the smushed stems of jewel weed to ease the itch of poison ivy. It produces orange or yellow flowers later in summer. Please send a clear in-focus photo and we'll confirm.

Impatiens Balfourii (impatiens balfourii): Not grown that much but often comes up on its own. An annual that has naturalized near the coast. Loves light shade and regular water.

Impatiens Balfourii (impatiens balfourii): Not grown that much but often comes up on its own. An annual that has naturalized near the coast. Loves light shade and regular water.

Burdock (arctium lappa): This is burdock, a biennial weed with large leaves and a giant roots (eaten in Japan as gobo).  It's very hard to get rid of because the root is so large.  Flower stalks can be 4-5 feet tall.  The individual flowers look like thistle flowers.

Burdock (arctium lappa): This is burdock, a biennial weed with large leaves and a giant roots (eaten in Japan as gobo). It's very hard to get rid of because the root is so large. Flower stalks can be 4-5 feet tall. The individual flowers look like thistle flowers.

Morning Glory (ipomoea purpurea): Native to Mexico and Central America. Vine with beautiful sky-blue flowers. In warmer climates they'll quickly take over to the point of being invasive. Also called 'Bindweed' Does best in full sun with regular water and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for blooming vines.

Morning Glory (ipomoea purpurea): Native to Mexico and Central America. Vine with beautiful sky-blue flowers. In warmer climates they'll quickly take over to the point of being invasive. Also called 'Bindweed' Does best in full sun with regular water and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for blooming vines.

Crabapples (malus): These appear to be crab apples, of which there are many, many varieties.  Please consult with your local garden center or county extension agent before consuming any plant, for a second ID opinion.

Crabapples (malus): These appear to be crab apples, of which there are many, many varieties. Please consult with your local garden center or county extension agent before consuming any plant, for a second ID opinion.


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