Educators: Arts of China, Painting

Appreciating Chinese art is often described with the term du hua, “to read a painting.” On this board, the Freer|Sackler Education Department introduces Chinese paintings from the museum’s permanent collection. These albums, handscrolls, and hanging scrolls portray traditional Chinese subjects, such as landscapes, animals, flowers, and bamboo. To view detailed images and download them in high resolution, visit our online collection at open.asia.si.edu.
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The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

Horse and Groom, after Li Gonglin Zhao Yong China, Yuan dynasty, 1347 Handscroll; ink and color on paper

Chinese artists often use bamboo as a metaphor. Seen here surrounding a small…

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

Hostelry in the MountainsArtist: Yan Ciyu 閻次于 (active Medium: Ink and color on silk Type: Album, Painting Origin: China Date: mid- to late century Period: Southern Song dynasty Freer.

Bamboo After Rain on the Xiao and Xiang Rivers by Xia Chang (detail) Ming dynasty, 1464

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

Zhao Mengfu was a prince and descendant of the Song Dynasty's imperial family, and a Chinese scholar, painter and calligrapher during the Yuan Dynasty.

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery are the Smithsonian's museums of Asian art.

A handscroll allows a viewer to have an intimate relationship with its contents while unrolling the work from right to left, section by section. The calligraphy on this handscroll narrates the scene of Mr. Zhu, a poor but noted poet and book lover, accepting the gift of a donkey purchased with funds collected on his behalf by scholar-friends.

A handscroll allows a viewer to have an intimate relationship with its contents while unrolling the work from right to left, section by section. The calligraphy on this handscroll narrates the scene of Mr. Zhu, a poor but noted poet and book lover, accepting the gift of a donkey purchased with funds collected on his behalf by scholar-friends.

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