Kilwa Kisawani, Tanzania

Photos taken by David Stanley on Kilwa Kisawani, a remote Indian Ocean island in present Tanzania which was once the seat of the most powerful Swahili city state on the East African coast.
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A massive baobab tree is next to the Tombs of the Kilwa Sultans on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania.

A massive baobab tree is next to the Tombs of the Kilwa Sultans on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania.

The women of Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, favor colorful attire.

The 29 organizations highlight how this stance against educating pregnant students in Tanzania infringes on their human rights.

A local woman on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, shares a laugh.

A local woman on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, shares a laugh.

The 18th century Makutani Palace on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was a fortified residence of the family of the sultan.

The century Makutani Palace on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was a fortified residence of the family of the sultan.

The Gereza Kilwa Fort on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was originally built by the Portuguese in the early 16th century to control trade in gold, ivory, and slaves.

The Gereza Kilwa Fort on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was originally built by the Portuguese in the early century to control trade in gold, ivory, and slaves.

The Gereza Kilwa Fort on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was built by the Portuguese in 1505 and reconstructed by Omani Arabs after 1512. The name comes from the Portuguese "igreja" (church) which later came to mean "prison" in Swahili.

The Gereza Kilwa Fort on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, was built by the Portuguese in 1505 and reconstructed by Omani Arabs after The name comes from the Portuguese "igreja" (church) which later came to mean "prison" in Swahili.

Beginning in the 16th century the Gereza Kilwa Fort at Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, was used by the Portuguese and Omanis to control trade on the East African coast.

Beginning in the century the Gereza Kilwa Fort at Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, was used by the Portuguese and Omanis to control trade on the East African coast.

Residents of Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, perform a dance for overseas visitors.

Residents of Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, perform a dance for overseas visitors.

Most visitors to Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, arrive on this jetty.

Most visitors to Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, arrive on this jetty.

This thatched village house on Kilwa Kisiwani Island is typical of rural dwellings in Tanzania.

This thatched village house on Kilwa Kisiwani Island is typical of rural dwellings in Tanzania.

Several of the Tombs of the Kilwa Sultans on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, include phallic pillars. Originally ceramic plates decorated the tombs.

Several of the Tombs of the Kilwa Sultans on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, include phallic pillars. Originally ceramic plates decorated the tombs.

The 15th century Small Domed Mosque on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, originally had three bays but the eastern aisle has collapsed.

The century Small Domed Mosque on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, originally had three bays but the eastern aisle has collapsed.

The Small Domed Mosque on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, dates from the 15th century when a Swahili sultanate was based here.

The Small Domed Mosque on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania, dates from the century when a Swahili sultanate was based here.

The 18th century Makutani Palace is one of the most impressive ruined buildings on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania. The women of the sultan's family lived upstairs.

The century Makutani Palace is one of the most impressive ruined buildings on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania. The women of the sultan's family lived upstairs.

The Makutani Palace was a stronghold of the Omani sultans who controlled Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, in the 18th century.

The Makutani Palace was a stronghold of the Omani sultans who controlled Kilwa Kisiwani, Tanzania, in the century.

Tree roots cling to a 15th century wall on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania. In 1981 the ruins of the powerful Swahili sultanate on the island were declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Tree roots cling to a century wall on Kilwa Kisiwani Island, Tanzania. In 1981 the ruins of the powerful Swahili sultanate on the island were declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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