classical

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The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine
The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine
The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine

Kitchens

6 Pins
Ostia Puertos de Claudio y Trajano

Cities

11 Pins
Paper Making__ADV Roman History collection

Trades and industry

1 Pin
Circus Maximus. The Roman circus (from Latin, "circle") was a large open-air venue used for public events in the ancient Roman Empire. The circuses were similar to the ancient Greek hippodromes, although circuses served varying purposes and differed in design and construction. Along with theatres and amphitheatres, Circuses were one of the main entertainment sites of the time. Circuses were venues for chariot races, horse races, and performances.

Collesium

4 Pins
Roman bathrooms were not solely for infrastructure and social interactions; hygiene was also a significant aspect

Roman bathroom

1 Pin

Roman soldiers

1 Pin
private toilet
the public baths ~ at the bottom one can see the slave feeding the hypocaust system

Baths

13 Pins

House/villa

64 Pins
an aerial view of a city with tall buildings and lots of people walking around it
The Roman Forum in the 4th century. Rome, Roman Forum (Roma, Foro Romano)
an image of a drawing of a train track with its name and description on it
Circus Maximus. The Roman circus (from Latin, "circle") was a large open-air venue used for public events in the ancient Roman Empire. The circuses were similar to the ancient Greek hippodromes, although circuses served varying purposes and differed in design and construction. Along with theatres and amphitheatres, Circuses were one of the main entertainment sites of the time. Circuses were venues for chariot races, horse races, and performances.
an artist's rendering of a courtyard with people walking around and looking at a map
Roman 'gladiator school' recreated virtually
Virtual reconstruction of Roman 'gladiator school'
a group of people sitting around a table eating food
The Romans: What They Ate
The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine
an old room with some paintings on the wall and two urinals in it
The Romans: What They Ate
The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine
a painting of fruit and vegetables in a bowl on a table next to an onion bag
The Romans: What They Ate
The Romans: What They Ate | ITALY Magazine
an old painting with many people around it
The Romans: What They Ate
As Italy commemorates the anniversary of the death of the first Roman Emperor, Augustus, in 14AD, in the first part of an ongoing series, we investigate what the Romans ate
an artist's rendering of what the fort would look like if it were built
Ostia, Portus Romae - Revista de Historia
Ostia Puertos de Claudio y Trajano
an artist's rendering of a courtyard and swimming pool in the middle of town
Nemausus (Nîmes) - Jean-Claude Golvin
two different views of the ancient city
What Ancient Greece Really Looked Like: See Reconstructions of the Temple of Hadrian, Curetes Street & the Fountain of Trajan
people standing around in front of a building with statues on the outside and one person taking pictures
Governmental control of trade is another Roman innovation.
Goods were stamped with seals marking where they were made, the port they left from and arrived to, and – depending on the type of goods – their level of purity and weight. Merchants who dealt regularly in import-export frequently took out a loan in one port-city and paid it back in another, a practice which gave rise to the development of banks.