London Review of Books. 2 April 1981. Cover: R. B. Kitaj.

Art and Objects by Wollheim

A fox walks past the South London house of Peter Campbell, in his last cover illustration for the London Review of Books. Image: London Review of Books

A fox walks past the South London house of Peter Campbell, in his last cover illustration for the London Review of Books. Image: London Review of Books

Peter Campbells London Review of Books covers

Peter Campbell's London Review of Books covers

Peter Campbells London Review of Books covers

Finding my way...in England: A Literature Festival and London Review of Books

The river Thames en route to Richmond with a stopover at Petersham's Nurseries.

Finding my way...in England: A Literature Festival and London Review of Books

The river Thames en route to Richmond with a stopover at Petersham's Nurseries.

Finding my way...in England: A Literature Festival and London Review of Books

The river Thames en route to Richmond with a stopover at Petersham's Nurseries.

Contents, October

London Review of Books. 3 November 2011. Cover: Peter Campbell.

London Review of Books. 3 November 2011. Cover: Peter Campbell.

London Review of Books. 25 February 2010. Cover: Peter Campbell.

London Review of Books. 25 February 2010. Cover: Peter Campbell.

London Review of Books. 4 March 1982.

London Review of Books. 4 March 1982.

Nietzsche’s first book, The Birth of Tragedy, was published in 1872, when he was 27, and while he was a Professor of Classics at Basel. It had the unusual effect, for him, of attracting some attention at the time of its appearance: after that, Nietzsche’s writings virtually ceased to . . .

LRB · Bernard Williams · Nietzsche’s Centaur

LRB · Angela Carter · Mise-en-Scène for a Parricide

Early in the morning of the fourth of August, .

Что почитать об истории человеческой сексуальности? — TheQuestion

Что почитать об истории человеческой сексуальности? — TheQuestion

Some great and some good things, and some both great and good, undoubtedly came out of the period 1640-60 which Christopher Hill calls ‘the English Revolution’. What came out, however, was not necessarily originated by the period. It is a nice problem to distinguish causation from . . .

Some great and some good things, and some both great and good, undoubtedly came out of the period 1640-60 which Christopher Hill calls ‘the English Revolution’. What came out, however, was not necessarily originated by the period. It is a nice problem to distinguish causation from . . .

London Review of Books. 6 January 2000. Cover: Peter Campbell.

London Review of Books. 6 January 2000. Cover: Peter Campbell.

Pinterest
Search