Whose Bright Idea Was It? - Manitoba Style

Local brains at work creating better tomorrows for all of us. (from the Winnipeg Sun)
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30 made-in-Manitoba inventions to be thankful for

Thomas Garnet (Gar) Gillies created the Garnet Amplifier, a vacuum tube-based amplifier that gave rock bands like The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive a distinctive, gritty sound

Thomas Garnet (Gar) Gillies created the Garnet Amplifier, a vacuum tube-based amplifier that gave rock bands like The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive a distinctive, gritty sound

30 made-in-Manitoba inventions to be thankful for

Better known for being the inspiration for James Bond, Winnipegger Sir William Stephenson also invented a wire photo transmitter for newspapers to immediately share images that eventually became the fax machine.

30 made-in-Manitoba inventions to be thankful for

Kelly Sveinson invented the first insulated prefabricated chimney, using a metal Coca-Cola sign for raw material in 1933. It's known as a 'Selkirk chimney' worldwide.

Kelly Sveinson invented the first insulated prefabricated chimney, using a metal Coca-Cola sign for raw material in It's known as a 'Selkirk chimney' worldwide.

P. J. E. Peebles graduated from high school in St. Boniface and then went on to be one of the team that came up with the Big Bang Theory (no, not the TV show).

Peebles graduated from high school in St. Boniface and then went on to be one of the team that came up with the Big Bang Theory (no, not the TV show).

Five Winnipeggers -- Randy Dueck, Gerry Terwin, Duncan Campbell, Chris Sargent and Paul Lejeune -- originated the game of murderball, a.k.a. wheelchair rugby, in 1975.

"When people in the community see you in a chair they kinda treat you like you're made of glass or that you're fragile; But, in wheelchair rugby, it's kinda like high speed bumper cars.

Winnipeg emigrant John Hamerton discovered the number of human chromosomes  46, not 48 as had been believed.

Winnipeg emigrant John Hamerton discovered the number of human chromosomes not 48 as had been believed.

Martin Cooper grew up in the North End breaking apart Coke bottles to figure out how to burn paper and turned that curiosity into the first mobile phone for Motorola. Of course he made the first cellphone call on it, too. And yes, he says it was inspired by Star Trek's Communicator.

Martin Cooper Inventor of the portable cellular phone.had to have big pockets for that one.

The clank and clamour of metal garbage cans being moved to the curb was too much for Winnipegger Harry Wasylyk, who began experimenting with a newfangled material called polyethylene after the Second World War. His first plastic bags were made in his kitchen and supplied to the Winnipeg General Hospital. You may now know them as Glad-brand garbage bags.

30 made-in-Manitoba inventions to be thankful for

Want to know what it's liked to be stabbed? Police officer Jeff Quail invented the Shocknife in 2005 to add an element of authenticity to law enforcement training, which he found didn't properly prepare officers for the real-life threat presented by knives, screwdrivers and other edged weapons.

You're not bulletproof., Shock Knife (This is more of a training tool than.

Henry Makow was working as a freelance writer in Winnipeg when he came up with Scruples, a game of moral dilemmas.

Henry Makow was working as a freelance writer in Winnipeg when he came up with Scruples, a game of moral dilemmas.

Hans Kraus started inventing things before he emigrated to Winnipeg in 1960, but is perhaps best known as the man who made Command Start a reality, refining an earlier patent and putting it into mass production.

Hans Kraus started inventing things before he emigrated to Winnipeg in but is perhaps best known as the man who made Command Start a reality, refining an earlier patent and putting it into mass production.

Yvonne Brill was rejected from U of M's engineering program because of her gender and went on to develop the concept for a new rocket engine, the hydrazine resistojet.

30 made-in-Manitoba inventions to be thankful for

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the tundra buggy -- on large rubber tires that can roll over tundra -- was invented in Churchill by Dan Guravich and Len Smith in 1978. Bonus: It also protects against the polar bears it enables riders to visit.

A polar bear checks out a Tundra Buggy as the Trekker collects Street View imagery of it.

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