Manitoba history

Collection by Jennifer Czarnecki • Last updated 8 weeks ago

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Jennifer Czarnecki
The History of the Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket Canadian History, Canadian Art, Native American History, Native American Indians, Canadian Things, Canadian Symbols, Mountain Man, Hudson Bay Blanket, Bay Point

The History of the Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket

(Photo via rowellphoto.com) Very few blankets hold the iconic status that Hudson's Bay Point blankets do. These stripped blankets were created by the Hudson's Bay Company in the Northern part of North America in 1780. Typically, the wool blankets were traded with Native Americans for pelts; arctic fox, lynx and most importantly beaver. The beaver pelts were shipped to Europe…

This book has helped me with my family history, and is very helpful if your family lived in the Red River Settlement in the which is now Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Canadian History, Native American History, Aboriginal Language, Ancestry Tree, Indigenous Education, My Family History, Canada, Red River, History Facts

This book has helped me with my family history, and is very helpful if your family lived in the Red River Settlement in the 1830s which is now Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Marie-Anne Lagimodière (née Gaboury) – was a French-Canadian woman… Canadian History, Native American History, Native Canadian, Canadian Prairies, Women In History, Family History, Western Canada, Wise Women, Historical Quotes

Marie-Anne Lagimodière (née Gaboury) (1780 – 1875) was a French-Canadian woman noted as both the grandmother of Louis Riel, and as the first woman of European descent to travel to and settle in what is now Western Canada. She is sometimes remembered as the "Grandmother of the Red River", and many of the Métis people of the Canadian Prairies can trace their ancestry to her.

Women at Red River and the Resistance, Canadian History, Native American History, Black Canadians, Fur Trade, Pow Wow, Red River, Le Far West, Canada, Founding Fathers

Women at Red River and the Resistance, 1869-1870

[under construction] N. Hall, digitally constructed photo montage, "Women of Red River," (2012). Click on the image to embiggen. Key, in rows, left to right, beginning from the top: ♦ Letitia Bird (photographed 1858); Jane Inkster/ Mrs. Tait (photographed c. 1915); Anne Christie 'Annie' Ballenden (born 1837); Clothilde Bruneau/ Mrs. J.F. Grant (born 1850); Catherine McDermot/…

With Manitoba named one of Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel for you owe it to yourself and your sense of adventure to discover what all the fuss is about and now is as good a time as any. Here are 10 reasons why we’re one of the best regions in the world Packing List For Vacation, Vacation Trips, Vacations, Vacation Ideas, Canadian Prairies, Clear Lake, Newfoundland, Canada Travel, Travel Photos

10 reasons Manitoba is one of the best regions in the world

Header photo: Cody Fjeldsted Manitoba can sometimes be taken for granted, even overlooked. But for those who have chosen to give the prairie province a chance, they have discovered why Manitoban pride abounds and what makes this place so special. With Manitoba named one of Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel for 2019, you owe it to yourself and your sense of adventure to discover what all the fuss is about and now is as good a time as any. Here are 10 reasons why we’re one of the best regions in…

Canada Manitoba Immigration Poster 1892 Print by BloominLuvly Canadian Things, I Am Canadian, Canadian History, Ontario, Short Passage, Toronto, History Timeline, History Photos, Canada Day

Canada Manitoba Immigration Poster 1892 - Print

Canada Manitoba Immigration Poster 1892 - Print Prints from old-time Travel Posters. This one was to encourage immigration to Manitoba Canada and to the others States of the great wheat belt Seskatchewan, Alberta etc. It was issued in Ottawa in 1892 under the aegis of HM Queen Victoria whose Arms are shown at the top. This is a lovely old poster - very evocative of the age. The quality of the printing was not a priority when this was printed all those years ago so, by modern standards…

Pierre Bottineau, the French-Canadian fur-trapper and explorer for whom Bottineau, ND is named. Date unknown. My Family History, World History, North Dakota, North America, Fur Trade, Indian Pictures, Fun World, Red River, Le Far West

Pierre Bottineau, the French-Canadian fur-trapper and explorer for whom Bottineau, ND is named. Date unknown.

From Stories of my Ancestors: Red River Settlement Map Women In History, Family History, Fur Trade, The Settlers, Canadian History, World Globes, Teaching Social Studies, Canada, Le Far West

RED RIVER SETTLEMENT MAP

click on map to enlarge This map of the Red River Settlement in Manitoba is from the Metis Resource Centre http://www.metisresourcecentre.m...

The restored Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, recreates life in the fur-trade era. Places To Travel, Places To See, Red River Valley, Fur Trade, Parks Canada, Old Fort, Western Canada, Short Trip, Canada Travel

Lower Fort Garry: Life in the Canadian Fur Trade EraLower Fort Garry: Life in the Canadian Fur Trade Era

The restored Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, recreates life in the 1850s fur-trade era.

Louis Riel the puzzling Messianic figure of Canadian history was born into a devout Catholic family in St. Boniface Red River Settlement (present day Winnipeg) on October 22 or 23 Canadian French, I Am Canadian, Canadian History, Black Canadians, Government Of Canada, Western Canada, Red River, Present Day, First Nations

A Biography of Louis Riel

A biographical sketch of the historical figure who most symbolizes the tensions that define Canadian life.

Louis Riel the puzzling Messianic figure of Canadian history was born into a devout Catholic family in St. Boniface Red River Settlement (present day Winnipeg) on October 22 or 23 Canadian French, I Am Canadian, Canadian History, Black Canadians, Government Of Canada, Western Canada, Red River, Present Day, First Nations

A Biography of Louis Riel

A biographical sketch of the historical figure who most symbolizes the tensions that define Canadian life.