Robert Cavelier de La Salle, an early French explorer of Eastern Canada and Eastern United States, especially along the Mississippi River. In the US history books, he is considered "the greatest of the French explorers in North America"

Robert Cavelier de La Salle, an early French explorer of Eastern Canada and Eastern United States, especially along the Mississippi River. In the US history books, he is considered "the greatest of the French explorers in North America"

Samuel de Champlain (1574-08-13 – 1635-12-25). Le 3 juillet 1608, cet explorateur débarque à Québec en compagnie d'une trentaine d'ouvriers et y fonde le premier établissement français permanent en Amérique. Il dessine plusieurs cartes de la Nouvelle-France et il est l'auteur de nombreux récits de voyage, dont Voyages de la Nouvelle-France (1632). Image : George Agnew Reid - vers 1908 Bibliothèque et Archives Canada - Domaine public #patrimoine

Champlain written by Christopher Moore and illustrated by Francis Back

Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac - a French explorer - In 1701, he founded Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit, the beginnings of modern Detroit, which he commanded until 1710.

Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac - a French explorer - In he founded Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit, the beginnings of modern Detroit, which he commanded until

Father Jacques Marquette S.J. (June 1, 1637 – May 18, 1675), sometimes known as Père Marquette or James Marquette, was a French Jesuit missionary who founded Michigan's first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. In 1673 Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

Jacques Marquette was a Jesuit missionary who explored the northern Mississippi River in conjunction with Joliet. He established Sault Ste Marie in Michigan.

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye (November 17, 1685 – December 5, 1749) was a French Canadian military officer, fur trader and explorer. In the 1730s he and his four sons opened up the area west of Lake Superior and thus began the process that added Western Canada to the original New France in the Saint Lawrence basin. He was also the first European to reach North Dakota and the upper Missouri River, cross the prairies and see the Rocky Mountains.

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye (November 17, 1685 – December 5, 1749) was a French Canadian military officer, fur trader and explorer. In the 1730s he and his four sons opened up the area west of Lake Superior and thus began the process that added Western Canada to the original New France in the Saint Lawrence basin. He was also the first European to reach North Dakota and the upper Missouri River, cross the prairies and see the Rocky Mountains.

1st colonial empire: the Nouvelle France at its greatest extent, in 1712 [2000x2000]

colonial empire: the Nouvelle France at its greatest extent, in 1712

Jacques Cartier (December 31, 1491 – September 1, 1557) was a French explorer of Breton origin who claimed what is now Canada for France.[1][2][3][4] He was the first European to describe and map[5] the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the shores of the Saint Lawrence River, which he named "The Country of Canadas", after the Iroquois names for the two big settlements he saw at Stadacona (Quebec City) and at Hochelaga (Montreal Island).

Jacques Cartier by Théophile Hamel. Cartier was a French explorer who claimed Canada for France.

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vérendrye (1685-1749), outside the National Assembly in Québec City. A French Canadian military officer, fur trader and explorer, Gaultier and his four sons opened up the area west of Lake Superior. He was the first European to reach North Dakota and the upper Missouri River.

1738 – Pierre la Vérendrye left Lake of the Woods to explore the West, and founded Portage La Prairie.

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