For over 120 years, residents of “The Battery” in St.John’s have lived life on the edge. It's a stunningly beautiful place where “tiny colourful wooden homes cling valiantly to cliff-sides ravaged by ocean waves.” Oliver wants to know more about this vibrant community. Find out more at newfoundlandlabrador.com/top-destinations/st-johns

For over 120 years, residents of “The Battery” in St.John’s have lived life on the edge. It's a stunningly beautiful place where “tiny colourful wooden homes cling valiantly to cliff-sides ravaged by ocean waves.” Oliver wants to know more about this vibrant community. Find out more at newfoundlandlabrador.com/top-destinations/st-johns

Talk about a whopper! In 1878, fishermen near Glovers Harbour, NL caught a giant squid that was 16.7 metres (55 feet) long. It was “recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the biggest squid in the world.” A replica was built in 2001. Oliver thinks this is a little too much calamari for his taste. Find out more at: cbc.ca/archives/entry/sizable-squid-in-glovers-harbour-nfld

Talk about a whopper! In 1878, fishermen near Glovers Harbour, NL caught a giant squid that was 16.7 metres (55 feet) long. It was “recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the biggest squid in the world.” A replica was built in 2001. Oliver thinks this is a little too much calamari for his taste. Find out more at: cbc.ca/archives/entry/sizable-squid-in-glovers-harbour-nfld

“Rocky and windswept Fogo Island may look like nowhere you’ve ever been before, but spend a day on this far-eastern edge of Newfoundland, and you’ll feel like you’ve come home,” says National Geographic. Oliver certainly is fitting right in, perching on the rugged shore like the artistic Fogo Island Inn. Find out more at fogoislandinn.ca

“Rocky and windswept Fogo Island may look like nowhere you’ve ever been before, but spend a day on this far-eastern edge of Newfoundland, and you’ll feel like you’ve come home,” says National Geographic. Oliver certainly is fitting right in, perching on the rugged shore like the artistic Fogo Island Inn. Find out more at fogoislandinn.ca

Since 1992, the comical-looking puffin has been the official bird of Newfoundland and Labrador. Just outside Elliston, Newfoundland, you will find "the closest land views of these birds in North America." They’ve certainly caught Oliver’s attention. Find out more at townofelliston.ca/5ttd/puffins.html

Since 1992, the comical-looking puffin has been the official bird of Newfoundland and Labrador. Just outside Elliston, Newfoundland, you will find "the closest land views of these birds in North America." They’ve certainly caught Oliver’s attention. Find out more at townofelliston.ca/5ttd/puffins.html

The Hopewell Rocks that dot the shores of the Bay of Fundy near Moncton, NB, are also called ‘Flowerpot Rocks’ because of their “unusual shape of the formations and the tenacious trees that cling to their tops.” Oliver wants to find out what else can grow here! Find out more at: thehopewellrocks.ca

The Hopewell Rocks that dot the shores of the Bay of Fundy near Moncton, NB, are also called ‘Flowerpot Rocks’ because of their “unusual shape of the formations and the tenacious trees that cling to their tops.” Oliver wants to find out what else can grow here! Find out more at: thehopewellrocks.ca

Twice every day, the Bay of Fundy tides can reach “the height of a four-storey building.” That great rush of water creates some pretty interesting nooks and crannies, like St. Martins Sea Caves. Oliver loves to explore, but he wants to make sure he doesn’t get caught in the tide. Find out more at: stmartinscanada.com

Twice every day, the Bay of Fundy tides can reach “the height of a four-storey building.” That great rush of water creates some pretty interesting nooks and crannies, like St. Martins Sea Caves. Oliver loves to explore, but he wants to make sure he doesn’t get caught in the tide. Find out more at: stmartinscanada.com

Long recognised as the "The Lobster Capital of the World", Ville de Shediac / Town of Shediac, NB constructed the world’s largest lobster in 1989. Oliver didn’t want to miss this picture perfect opportunity to pay “tribute to the delectable crustacean who promotes its role in the development of the community.” Find out more at: tourismnewbrunswick.ca/Pr…/T/The-Worlds-Largest-Lobster.aspx

Long recognised as the "The Lobster Capital of the World", Ville de Shediac / Town of Shediac, NB constructed the world’s largest lobster in 1989. Oliver didn’t want to miss this picture perfect opportunity to pay “tribute to the delectable crustacean who promotes its role in the development of the community.” Find out more at: tourismnewbrunswick.ca/Pr…/T/The-Worlds-Largest-Lobster.aspx

Oliver loves to take the high road and what better place to do so than on the longest in the world crossing ice-covered water. Since 1997, the curved, 12.9 kilometre (8 mile) long Confederation Bridge has endured “as one of Canada’s top engineering achievements of the 20th century.” Find out more at: confederationbridge.com

Oliver loves to take the high road and what better place to do so than on the longest in the world crossing ice-covered water. Since 1997, the curved, 12.9 kilometre (8 mile) long Confederation Bridge has endured “as one of Canada’s top engineering achievements of the 20th century.” Find out more at: confederationbridge.com

Since the late 1800s, lighthouses have been guiding ships to Canada’s eastern shores. To this day many still maintain their original purpose, but lighthouses like the rear tower on Cape Tormentine have become a home for nesting birds. Oliver thinks the amazing view is the birds’ main attraction. Find out more at: http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=995

Since the late 1800s, lighthouses have been guiding ships to Canada’s eastern shores. To this day many still maintain their original purpose, but lighthouses like the rear tower on Cape Tormentine have become a home for nesting birds. Oliver thinks the amazing view is the birds’ main attraction. Find out more at: http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=995

Sauntering around the Royal Plaza in historic Old Quebec is like “stepping back in time to the earliest days of Québec City,” no time machine required. There is so much history behind every brick, and Oliver wants to leave no stone unturned. Find out more at: https://www.quebecregion.com/en/old-quebec-summer/

Sauntering around the Royal Plaza in historic Old Quebec is like “stepping back in time to the earliest days of Québec City,” no time machine required. There is so much history behind every brick, and Oliver wants to leave no stone unturned. Find out more at: https://www.quebecregion.com/en/old-quebec-summer/

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