Explore King Hezekiah, Chapter 33, and more!

Taylor prism on display at the British Museum. Describes the Assyrian king Sennacherib's siege of Jerusalem in 701 BC during the reign of king Hezekiah, which is recorded by Herodotus and the Bible in Isaiah chapters 33 and 36; 2 Kings 18:17; 2 Chronicles 32:9. Photo by David Castor.

Taylor prism on display at the British Museum. Describes the Assyrian king Sennacherib's siege of Jerusalem in 701 BC during the reign of king Hezekiah, which is recorded by Herodotus and the Bible in Isaiah chapters 33 and 2 Kings 2 Chronicles

Stele de Merneptah musee du Caire

The Merneptah Stele, also known as the Israel Stele is an inscription by the Ancient Egyptian king Merneptah from the XIII Century BCE found in Thebes in the late XIX Century

Cyrus Cylinder. "...I am Cyrus. King of the world. When I entered Babylon...I did not allow anyone to terrorize the land...I kept in view the needs of the people and all its sanctuaries to promote their well-being...I put an end to their misfortune. The Great God has delivered all the lands into my hand; the lands that I have made to dwell in a peaceful habitation..." Site of Babylon, archaeologists discover a clay cylinder, inscribed record of capture of Babylon by the Persian king Cyrus…

Rear view of a barrel-shaped clay cylinder resting on a stand. The cylinder is covered with lines of cuneiform text

The Taylor Prism from the Neo-Assyrian empire tells the story of king Sennacherib's third campaign and includes descriptions of his conquests in Judah, some of which are described from another point of view in the old testament of the Bible.  The annals themselves are notable for describing his siege of Jerusalem during the reign of king Hezekiah. This event is recorded in several books contained in the Bible including Isaiah chapters 33 and 36; 2 Kings 18:17; 2 Chronicles 32:9.

Describes the Assyrian king Sennacherib's siege of Jerusalem in 701 BC during the reign of king Hezekiah. Kings 18 and British Museum, Oriental Institute of Chicago, and the Israel Museum

This “famine stele” records the occurrence of a “7 year drought” in ancient Egypt during the reign of king Djoser (ruled 2691-2625 BC).

This “famine stele” records the occurrence of a year drought” in ancient Egypt during the reign of king Djoser (ruled BC). RCCF calibrated about 2250 AM so = # of years ago = 3526 during term of Joseph aka Imehotep

Caiaphas Ossuary In 1990 a startling discovery was made that shook biblical scholars and archaeologists alike. In the Peace Forest section of Jerusalem was discovered a burial cave containing twelve ossuaries, one of them being none other than that of Caiaphas, the high priest who presided at the trial of Jesus. This amazing discovery provides us with a powerful historical connection to the events described in the Gospels.

The Caiaphas Ossuary - Caiaphas, the Jewish High Priest, played a prominent role in Jesus’ crucifixion. It was Caiaphas who sacrificed Christ in the interests of “expediency.

The ancient mud brick gate at Dan, Israel, is nearly 4,000 years old. It is very likely that Abraham of the Bible walked through it. When hi...

The ancient mud brick gate at Dan, Israel, is nearly years old. It is very likely that Abraham of the Bible walked through it. "When his nephew Lot was taken captive, he went to rescue him and came there.

This limestone monument, known as the Kurkh Monolith, is apporximately seven feet high and is now located in the British Museum.  Discovered in 1862 in Kurkh, Turkey, it was originally carved in c. 850 BC by the Assyrians.  The cuneiform text refers to a battle involving King Ahab of Israel, who is also frequently referred to in the Bible (cf. 1Kings).

Kurkh Monolith (c. BC) - British Museum – names King Ahab of Israel, erected by Shalmaneser III to commemorate the Battle of Karkar, which Ahab participated in along with many other regional leaders.

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III was made in c. 827 BC in ancient Assyria. The cuneiform text reads, "Tribute of Jehu, son of Omri"  Both Jehu and Omri were Israelite kings who are referred to in the Bible (cf. 1 & 2 Kings). The obelisk is now in the British Museum. Mystery of History Volume 1, Lesson 37 #MOHI37

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III was made in c. 827 BC in ancient Assyria.

This clay tablet from ancient Babylon describes monthly rations allowed to Jehoiachin, a Jewish king. The Biblical account of King Jehoiachin is found in 2 Kings 25:29-30, which also states that he received a "regular allowance" from the king of Babylon. The tablet was made in c. 595-570 BC, discovered in Babylon in c. 1900.  The text is in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script. The artifact is now located in the Museum of the Ancient Near East, Pergamum Museum, Berlin.

This clay tablet from ancient Babylon describes monthly rations allowed to Jehoiachin, a Jewish king. The biblical account of King Jeho.

The first ever mention of the name "Israel" found on The Merneptah Stele dating1205 BC, a black granite slab, with an inscription of the Ancient Egyptian king Merneptah (1213 to 1203 BCE).  The text partly deal with a separate campaign in Canaan. The Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

The first probable instance of the name "Israel" in the archeological record -- Discovered in Thebes on The Merneptah Stele, a black granite slab, 10 ft high, with an inscription of the Egyptian king, Merneptah to 1203 BCE).

Uzziah Tomb Inscription. Text details archaeological discoveries that  verify Biblical accounts.

Archaeology Proves the Bible Record

Esarhaddon was an Assyrian king noted in Biblical passages such as 2 Kings 19:37. He erected the monument to commemorate a military victory in Egypt. The dolerite monument is over ten feet high and was made in the 7th century BC. It was found in 1881 in the modern city of Zinjirli, Turkey, and the text is written in the Akkadian language using cuneiform script. Esarhaddon himself is depicted in the carving, which is now located in the Museum of the Ancient Near East, Pergamum Museum, Berlin.

Esarhaddon was an Assyrian king noted in Biblical passages such as 2 Kings He erected the monument to commemorate a military victory in Egypt. The dolerite monument is over ten feet high and was made in the century BC. It was found in 1881 in t

Clay bullae from the City of David, Jerusalem, provide new evidence for Biblical figures

These clay bullae (seal impressions), discovered by archaeologist Eilat Mazar during her excavations of the City of David, Jerusalem, bear the names of two royal ministers mentioned in the Bible’s story of Jeremiah, prophet of the Old Testament.

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