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Arriving at Skagway or Dyea from San Francisco or Seattle

The Klondike or Yukon Gold Rush is something of a legend and was a short but a thrilling time period.

Days of the Klondike Gold Rush, photo archived at MacBride Museum, Whitehorse, Yukon

Days of the Klondike Gold Rush, photo archived at MacBride Museum, Whitehorse, Yukon

Fort Garry, at the junction of the Red & Assiniboine Rivers in 1869, just when the Métis, who had lived here in peace for generations, were starting to feel threatened by the actions of the Canadian Government. Painted by Lionel Macdonald Stephenson, a 15 year old resident, who was to paint many of these and sell them to the soldiers sent west, in 1870, to put the Métis in their place.

Upper Fort Garry, at the junction of the Red & Assiniboine Rivers in 1869 [now Winnipeg MB]

Klondike Gold Rush prospectors and Alaska Native packers rest while others make their way up the rocky path toward The Scales on their way to the Chilkoot Pass summit in 1897. A sturdy people, the Chilkat Indian men could pack up to 200 pounds on their backs and women and children could carry about 75 pounds each. They charged the stampeders $1 per pound to haul their gear up the trail.

Klondike Gold Rush prospectors and Alaska Native packers rest while others make their way up the rocky path toward The Scales on their way to the Chilkoot Pass summit in 1897. A sturdy people, the Chilkat Indian men could pack up to 200 pounds on their backs and women and children could carry about 75 pounds each. They charged the stampeders $1 per pound to haul their gear up the trail.

December 1897, Dawson, Yukon Territory. A steamer at dockside, men standing on the shore, and wooden buildings, some under construction, at Dawson City, Yukon Territory. F.D. Fujiwara - LC-DIG-ppmsca-08717 http://www.loc.gov #American #History #Alaska #GoldRush

December 1897, Dawson, Yukon Territory. A steamer at dockside, men standing on the shore, and wooden buildings, some under construction, at Dawson City, Yukon Territory. F.D. Fujiwara - LC-DIG-ppmsca-08717 http://www.loc.gov #American #History #Alaska #GoldRush

Miners Waiting to Register Claims, Klondike (Alaska or Yukon) Gold Rush (1898) Dawson, British Columbia, Canada

Miners Waiting to Register Claims, Klondike (Alaska or Yukon) Gold Rush Dawson, British Columbia, Canada

French Camp, along the Skagway [White Pass] Trail.

French Camp, along the Skagway [White Pass] Trail.

The Klondike Gold Rush, also called the  Alaska Gold Rush among others, was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899. Gold was discovered on August 16, 1896 and, when news reached Seattle and San Francisco the following year, it triggered a "stampede" 30,000 and 40,000 managed to arrive. Some became wealthy; however, and only around 4,000 struck gold. The Klondike Gold Rush ended in 1899.

The Klondike Gold Rush, also called the Alaska Gold Rush among others, was a migration by an estimated prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899

Skagway, which sits in a narrow glaciated valley at the head of the Taiya Inlet, was established as a result of the Klondike Gold Rush to Canada’s Yukon Territory. Thousands of prospectors traveled through the Southeast Alaska town as they began the arduous 500-plus-mile journey to the gold fields via either the White Pass or Chilkoot Pass trails.

Skagway, which sits in a narrow glaciated valley at the head of the Taiya Inlet…

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