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Bruxism

Grandiloquent Word of the Day: Bruxism (BRUK-siz-um) Noun: -Involuntary and habitual grinding of the teeth -The habit of unconsciously gritting or grinding the teeth especially in situations of stress.

As in, I will be sooo glad when this fad of ambulonecrophobia is over.  Get over the zombies, folks!

-The fear of zombies (literally, the fear of the walking dead). ***Also called Kinemortophobia*** Used in a sentence: "After working one summer as a mortician's assistant, Mortimer developed acute ambulonecrophobia.

Garrulous (GAIR-uh-luhs) Adjective: -Excessively talkative, especially on trivial matters. -Given to constant and frivolous chatter; loquacious; talkative. -Given to excessive and often trivial or rambling talk; tiresomely talkative. -Given to prosy, rambling, or tedious loquacity.  From Latin garrulus, from garrīre to chatter.  Used in a sentence: “Judith is trying to find any excuse to get out of going to visit her garrulous grandmother."

Garrulous (GAIR-uh-luhs) Adjective: -Excessively talkative, especially on trivial matters. -Given to constant and frivolous chatter; -Given to excessive and often trivial or rambling talk; -Given to prosy,.

Adulate (AJ-yuh-layt)  Verb: -To praise someone excessively or obsequiously. -To flatter or admire slavishly.  Back-formation from adulation, from Latin adulari (to flatter, to fawn upon, like a dog wagging its tail). Earliest documented use: 1777; adulation is from around 1400.  Used in a sentence: “Why does the media insist on continuing to adulate and fawn at the feet of people who do not deserve celebrity?”

Adulate (AJ-yuh-layt) Verb: -To praise someone excessively or obsequiously. -To flatter or admire slavishly. Back-formation from adulation, from Latin adulari (to flatter, to fawn upon, like a dog wagging its tail). Earliest documented use:

Quafftide or Quaff-tide (KWAF-tyde) Noun: -The time or season for drinking.  From Quaff - To drink a beverage, especially an alcoholic one. Of uncertain origin. First used circa 1515.  Used in a sentence: “Quafftide comes but once a year, So let’s all be filled with pleasant cheer! Hie we all to the rathskeller now, Before the white serjeant takes her bow! The knocker-up comes at five, Then back to work we all must strive!”

Quafftide or Quaff-tide (KWAF-tyde) Noun: -The time or season for drinking. From Quaff - To drink a beverage, especially an alcoholic one. Of uncertain origin. First used circa Used in a.

Collywobbles (KOL•ee•wob•ulls) Noun: -Stomach pain or queasiness. -Intense anxiety or nervousness & associated symptoms.  This is a cute word to describe the "butterflies in one's stomach".  Used in a sentence: "Last night, while I was waiting for Percival to ring me up, I was overcome with the worst case of collywobbles ever; I was downright borborygmus!"

One of my all-time favorites: collywobbles. Butterflies in your stomach, queasy feeling, etc.

Agerasia (a-jer-AY-zee-a) Noun: -The state of exhibiting no signs of aging. -A youthful appearance not commensurate with old age. -A green old age; freshness and vigor of mind and body late in...

Agerasia (a-jer-AY-zee-a) Noun: -The state of exhibiting no signs of aging. -A youthful appearance not commensurate with old age. -A green old age; freshness and vigor of mind and body late in life. -An outward appearance more youthful than one’s.

Vomitory (VOM•ih•tor•ee) Noun: -The doors of a large building by which the crowd is let out. -Passage or opening in an ancient amphitheater, leading to or from the seats.  Adjective: -Denoting the entrance or exit passages in a theater or amphitheater.  From: Late Latin vomitorium, from Latin vomere; meaning "spew forth, discharge," from its disgorging the spectators. First Known Use: 1730

Vomitory:- the door of a large building through which the crowd exits

Grandiloquent Word of the Day: Skint (skint) Adjective: -Having little to no money available.

Sprauncy (Sproncy) (sp’RAWN-see or shp’RAWN-see) Adjective: -Smart or showy in appearance; dapper. -Showily dressed; fashionable.  Verb form: Spraunce or Spronce -To show off, especially by your choice of clothes.  Used in a sentence: “Well would you just look at sprauncy Mr. La-dee-da there with his surtout and top hat, who does he think he’s fooling?”

Sprauncy (Sproncy) (sp’RAWN-see or shp’RAWN-see) Adjective: -Smart or showy in appearance; Verb form: Spraunce or Spronce -To show off, especially by your choice.

Sardoodledom (sar-DOO-dl-dum) Noun: -A play with an over-written and melodramatic plot. -Mechanically contrived plot structure and stereotyped or unrealistic characterization in drama -Well-made works of drama that have trivial, insignificant, or morally objectionable plots.  From the name of the French dramatist Sardou + doodle + -dom.  Used in a sentence: “Some days, it feels like I’m the unwitting player in a sardoodledom.”

Sardoodledom (sar-DOO-dl-dum) Noun: -A play with an over-written and melodramatic plot. -Mechanically contrived plot structure and stereotyped or unrealistic characterization in drama -Well-made works of drama that have trivial, insignificant, or.

Kakistocracy | Define Kakistocracy at Dictionary.com

Todays Word is ignis fatuus: something deluding or misleading. This word is from modern Latin meaning foolish fire. The English word is the same as the Latin word.

#Dictionary.com #WordoftheDay

How is entelechy significant to aristotle's ethics essay Aristotle and Eudaimonia. Aristotle Essay, of all those concerned with questions on Ethics. Aristotle’s account of a good life is defined in.

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