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Philae, being accounted one of the burying-places of Osiris, was held in high reverence to Egyptians. This is the original location, before it was moved "Bonfils Stereoscopic Views Series: ""Vues de tout l'Orient"" [c 1867-c 1914]

Philae, being accounted one of the burying-places of Osiris, was held in high reverence to Egyptians. This is the original location, before it was moved "Bonfils Stereoscopic Views Series: ""Vues de tout l'Orient"" [c

mothcosmia: “ Bronze figure of Sobek: this solid cast figure depicts the god Sobek as a plump crocodile sprawled on a hollow shrine shaped plinth. The details of his scales are carefully incised, his...

mothcosmia: “ Bronze figure of Sobek: this solid cast figure depicts the god Sobek as a plump crocodile sprawled on a hollow shrine shaped plinth. The details of his scales are carefully incised, his.

Block Statue of Ahmes, Son of Pakharkhonsu

The Courtyard of the Cachette in the Temple of Amun at Karnak in Luxor (Ancient Thebes), Egypt, Part II: Block Statue of Ahmes, Son of Pakharkhonsu

The Boy King, Tut, Cairo Museum of Egyptian Antiquities

The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with the wrong glue, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning.

Amelia Peabody, Ancient Egypt, Ancient History, Egyptian Mythology, Egyptians, Relief, Emerson, Archaeology, Travelling

Rock Cut Tomb in Upper Egypt (South), Egypt

The top destination for Megaliths and Prehistory worldwide. Tomb of Ramses III: [News and Chambered Tomb in Upper Egypt

"A game board in the form of a coiled snake was among the earliest Egyptian games. Using a set of lion-shaped and round markers, play started at the snake's tail, which was in the form of a bird's head. The two or four opponents raced each other to the goal located in the snake's head. Mehen was the name of the serpent deity whose coils protected the sun god."

"A game board in the form of a coiled snake was among the earliest Egyptian…

Magical Egyptian amulets in the Louvre. Called “hypocephalus”, they were placed under the heads of the deceased in order to protect them on their journeys into the afterlife. Instructions on their creation are included in the Book of the Dead and each is unique to the person it was buried with.

Magical Egyptian amulets in the Louvre. Called “hypocephalus”, they were placed under the heads of the deceased in order to protect them on their journeys into the afterlife. Instructions on their creation are included in the Book of the Dead and each is unique to the person it was buried with.

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