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USS New Ironsides. At the time of her construction, she was arguably the world's most powerful warship. One of the trio of ironclads initially laid down for the United States Navy in 1861. She took place in multiple engagements, and the Rebels attempted dozens of times to sink her. Ironically, she sank at anchor not long after the war ended under mysterious circumstances.

NH USS New Ironsides Line engraving published in The Soldier in Our Civil War, Volume II, page depicting the ship as she appeared during most of her operational career, without sailing rig. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

CSS Virginia was the first steam-powered ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy, built during the first year of the American Civil War; she was constructed as a casemate ironclad using the raised and cut down original lower hull and steam engines of the scuttled USS Merrimack. Virginia was one of the participants in the Battle of Hampton Roads, opposing the Union's USS Monitor in March, 1862. (Wikipedia)

CSS Virginia was the first steam-powered ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy, built during the first year of the American Civil War; she was constructed as a casemate ironclad using the raised and cut down original lower hull and steam engines of the scuttled USS Merrimack. Virginia was one of the participants in the Battle of Hampton Roads, opposing the Union's USS Monitor in March, 1862. (Wikipedia)

Civil War/ USS Louisville (1862-1865) Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the Western

Civil War/ USS Louisville Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the Western

Confederate ironclad, CSS Albemarle before her big battle to clear the Roanoke River in North Carolina in 1864. She was ultimately sunk by a union picket boat in a daring night attack in Oct 1864.

CSS Albemarle, twin-screw steamer, ironclad, sunk: October CSS Albemarle was a steam-powered ironclad ram of the Confederate Navy (and later the second Albemarle of the United States Navy), named for a town and a sound in North Carolina.

At the onset of war both the Army and Navy officers recognized the need for river gunboats complementing land operations along the Mississippi River and tributaries. The requirements for river operations - or "brown water" - differed significantly from the more traditional "blue water" navy's warship designs.

USS Baron de Kalb (briefly USS St. One of the "Pook Rams" or "City Class" Ironclads. Part of the Western Gunboat Flotilla.

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