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Olmec Jade Were-Jaguar Maske Circa: 900 BC to 600 BC Dimensions: 5.5” (14.0cm) high x 5.25” (13.3cm) wide

Olmec Jade Were-Jaguar Maske Circa: 900 BC to 600 BC Dimensions: high x wide

Pre-columbian Serpentine Teotihuacan Mask from Mexico, ca. 450-600 A.D. Exquisitely carved with perfect details. Oval shaped eyes, nice brow ridge with a protruding nose and tab like ears. Each ear perforated, which would of held earrings or earspools. This and more important Ancient Art from the world's best dealers at the curatorseye.com.  #ancientart

Pre-columbian Serpentine Teotihuacan Mask from Mexico, ca.

Maya Woman Figurine.  This modern reproduction of an ancient Maya figurine occupies a nicho in a colonial home in San Cristobal de las Casas Chiapas Mexico

This modern reproduction of an ancient Maya figurine occupies a nicho in a colonial home in San Cristobal de las Casas Chiapas Mexico

Pulque is an alcoholic drink which was first drunk by the Maya, Aztecs, Huastecs and other cultures in ancient Mesoamerica. Similar to beer, it is made from the fermented juice or sap of the maguey plant (Agave americana). In the Aztec language Nahuatl it was known as octli and to the Maya it was chih. Only mildly alcoholic, the potency of pulque was often increased with the addition of certain roots and herbs. The drink had its own personified goddess. (Article by Mark Cartwright) -- AHE

Pulque

Pulque is an alcoholic drink which was first drunk by the Maya, Aztecs, Huastecs and other cultures in ancient Mesoamerica.

Aztec Head   mexica The Museo Nacional de Antropología (National Museum of Anthropology) i

Aztec Head mexica The Museo Nacional de Antropología (National Museum of Anthropology) i

Although Olmecoid figurines are known in great formal variety, several, including this example, accord to a single visage that likely refers to an Olmec ideal—a rendition of healthy youth, neither fat nor starved, neither excessively robust nor effeminate. The face may  represent the eternal, amalgamated “ancestor” and, simultaneously, the maize deity, who was the ideal, original human. The earliest examples of the maize god in Maya art borrow this idealized Olmec face.

Although Olmecoid figurines are known in great formal variety, several, including this example, accord to a single visage that likely refers to an Olmec ideal—a rendition of healthy youth, neither fat nor starved, neither excessively robust nor effeminate. The face may represent the eternal, amalgamated “ancestor” and, simultaneously, the maize deity, who was the ideal, original human. The earliest examples of the maize god in Maya art borrow this idealized Olmec face.

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