Queen's Park Complex, Toronto, ON | Built in the 1960s as an annex to the Provincial Legislature, this office complex included several distinct landscapes conceived in a master plan by Sasaki, Strong and Associates. Threading through the entire complex, much of the landscape—with shaped mounds and mature trees—was built atop a parking garage. An exception is the northeast plaza, where Sasaki’s landscape rests upon raised pedestals. https://tclf.org/landscapes/queens-park-complex

Queen's Park Complex, Toronto, ON | Built in the 1960s as an annex to the Provincial Legislature, this office complex included several distinct landscapes conceived in a master plan by Sasaki, Strong and Associates. Threading through the entire complex, much of the landscape—with shaped mounds and mature trees—was built atop a parking garage. An exception is the northeast plaza, where Sasaki’s landscape rests upon raised pedestals. https://tclf.org/landscapes/queens-park-complex

Edwards Gardens, Toronto, ON | In 1944 Toronto businessman Rupert Edwards purchased this former homestead, an eleven-hectare parcel that had fallen into neglect. He transformed it into an elaborate garden with flowerbeds, ponds, wooden bridges, a private nine-hole golf course, and a rockery comprising 425 tons of stone. https://tclf.org/landscapes/edwards-gardens

Edwards Gardens, Toronto, ON | In 1944 Toronto businessman Rupert Edwards purchased this former homestead, an eleven-hectare parcel that had fallen into neglect. He transformed it into an elaborate garden with flowerbeds, ponds, wooden bridges, a private nine-hole golf course, and a rockery comprising 425 tons of stone. https://tclf.org/landscapes/edwards-gardens

Aga Khan Park, Toronto, ON | Home to the Aga Khan Museum, a repository of Islamic art and culture, and the Ismaili Centre, a religious site and venue for promoting the heritage of Ismaili Muslims, this 6.8-hectare site comprises four hectares of public gardens designed by Lebanese landscape architect Vladimir Djurovic with Moriyama & Teshima Planners. https://tclf.org/landscapes/aga-khan-park

Aga Khan Park, Toronto, ON | Home to the Aga Khan Museum, a repository of Islamic art and culture, and the Ismaili Centre, a religious site and venue for promoting the heritage of Ismaili Muslims, this 6.8-hectare site comprises four hectares of public gardens designed by Lebanese landscape architect Vladimir Djurovic with Moriyama & Teshima Planners. https://tclf.org/landscapes/aga-khan-park

Cloud Gardens, Toronto, ON | Located in Toronto’s financial district, this small (.2 hectares) site was set aside for use as a park in 1989 as an amenity of the nearby Bay-Adelaide office development. Designed by Baird Sampson Neuert Architects, the MBTW Group, Landscape Architects, and artist Margaret Priest in 1990, the park sits atop a subterranean parking garage and comprises several distinct spaces and elements. https://tclf.org/landscapes/cloud-gardens

Cloud Gardens, Toronto, ON | Located in Toronto’s financial district, this small (.2 hectares) site was set aside for use as a park in 1989 as an amenity of the nearby Bay-Adelaide office development. Designed by Baird Sampson Neuert Architects, the MBTW Group, Landscape Architects, and artist Margaret Priest in 1990, the park sits atop a subterranean parking garage and comprises several distinct spaces and elements. https://tclf.org/landscapes/cloud-gardens

Trinity Square, Toronto, ON | This site was originally a farm at the fork of Taddle Creek bordered by a forested swamp on the outskirts of town when it was secured in 1845 for the construction of the Church of the Holy Trinity. In 1981 Moorhead Fleming Corban McCarthy Landscape Architects and the Thom Partnership were commissioned by the City to design adjacent Trinity Square. https://tclf.org/landscapes/trinity-square

Trinity Square, Toronto, ON | This site was originally a farm at the fork of Taddle Creek bordered by a forested swamp on the outskirts of town when it was secured in 1845 for the construction of the Church of the Holy Trinity. In 1981 Moorhead Fleming Corban McCarthy Landscape Architects and the Thom Partnership were commissioned by the City to design adjacent Trinity Square. https://tclf.org/landscapes/trinity-square

Casa Loma, Toronto, ON | ‘Hill House’ was designed by architect E.J. Lennox and its owner, financier Sir Henry Pellatt.  The 98-room castle-like private residence was augmented by Victorian gardens, a marble-clad conservatory warmed by steam pipes, and stables with herringbone-tile floors and mahogany stalls connected to the house by a 243-meter-long tunnel. http://tclf.org/landscapes/casa-loma

Casa Loma, Toronto, ON | ‘Hill House’ was designed by architect E.J. Lennox and its owner, financier Sir Henry Pellatt. The 98-room castle-like private residence was augmented by Victorian gardens, a marble-clad conservatory warmed by steam pipes, and stables with herringbone-tile floors and mahogany stalls connected to the house by a 243-meter-long tunnel. http://tclf.org/landscapes/casa-loma

Devonian Square, Toronto, ON | Opened in 1978 on the campus of Ryerson University, this small park's defining feature is a large, oval reflecting pool, which doubles as an ice rink in winter. The park was designed by Richard Strong - Steven Moorhead, Ltd., Landscape Architects, in consultation with sculptor Gerard Gladstone. https://tclf.org/landscapes/devonian-square

Devonian Square, Toronto, ON | Opened in 1978 on the campus of Ryerson University, this small park's defining feature is a large, oval reflecting pool, which doubles as an ice rink in winter. The park was designed by Richard Strong - Steven Moorhead, Ltd., Landscape Architects, in consultation with sculptor Gerard Gladstone. https://tclf.org/landscapes/devonian-square

Corktown Common, Toronto, ON | Built on remediated industrial land  in the burgeoning West Don Lands neighborhood,  this eighteen-acre (7.3 hectares) park was designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates  and opened in 2013. Located along the west bank of the Don River near its mouth, nearly half the park sits atop a ‘flood protection landform,’  a massive flood mitigation feature composed of fill  added to the site’s former elevation. http://tclf.org/landscapes/corktown-common

Corktown Common, Toronto, ON | Built on remediated industrial land in the burgeoning West Don Lands neighborhood, this eighteen-acre (7.3 hectares) park was designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and opened in 2013. Located along the west bank of the Don River near its mouth, nearly half the park sits atop a ‘flood protection landform,’ a massive flood mitigation feature composed of fill added to the site’s former elevation. http://tclf.org/landscapes/corktown-common

Bain Co-operative Apartments, Toronto, ON | Begun in 1913 as a response to the city’s housing crisis, Riverdale Courts (now Bain Apartments Co-operative) was one of two housing projects  built by the Toronto Housing Company, a public-private partnership dedicated to providing comfortable but affordable homes for low-wage earners. https://tclf.org/landscapes/bain-co-operative-apartments

Bain Co-operative Apartments

Weston Family Quarry Garden, Toronto, ON | Situated in the city’s most prominent ravine, this 40-acre park was once a 120-foot-deep quarry. Ponds and wetlands along the park’s western flank provide urban habitat for aquatic plants and animals. Between the ponds and the Beltline Trail to the west are woodlands planted with native trees, as well as Carolinian species such as tulip trees, fragrant sumac, and eastern redbuds. http://tclf.org/landscapes/weston-family-quarry-garden

Weston Family Quarry Garden, Toronto, ON | Situated in the city’s most prominent ravine, this 40-acre park was once a 120-foot-deep quarry. Ponds and wetlands along the park’s western flank provide urban habitat for aquatic plants and animals. Between the ponds and the Beltline Trail to the west are woodlands planted with native trees, as well as Carolinian species such as tulip trees, fragrant sumac, and eastern redbuds. http://tclf.org/landscapes/weston-family-quarry-garden

Canadian Film Centre, Toronto, ON | Developed as the estate of Canadian businessman and racehorse breeder Edward Plunkett Taylor, this site was bequeathed to North York in 1969. The Georgian Revival main house and stables were designed by Ian Jocelyn in 1936 with additional buildings designed by Earle Morgan in the 1940s. In 1992 the site was designated a heritage property under the Ontario Heritage Act. https://tclf.org/landscapes/canadian-film-centre

Canadian Film Centre, Toronto, ON | Developed as the estate of Canadian businessman and racehorse breeder Edward Plunkett Taylor, this site was bequeathed to North York in 1969. The Georgian Revival main house and stables were designed by Ian Jocelyn in 1936 with additional buildings designed by Earle Morgan in the 1940s. In 1992 the site was designated a heritage property under the Ontario Heritage Act. https://tclf.org/landscapes/canadian-film-centre

Artscape Wychwood Barns, Toronto, ON | This two-hectare site formerly housed a repair and maintenance facility for streetcars. The facility closed in the mid-1980s and ownership of the site passed to the City of Toronto in 1998. The Toronto non-profit Artscape spearheaded a plan to re-purpose the barns, and in 2008 the remediated brownfield site re-opened as a multi-use community center and public park. https://tclf.org/landscapes/artscape-wychwood-barns

Artscape Wychwood Barns, Toronto, ON | This two-hectare site formerly housed a repair and maintenance facility for streetcars. The facility closed in the mid-1980s and ownership of the site passed to the City of Toronto in 1998. The Toronto non-profit Artscape spearheaded a plan to re-purpose the barns, and in 2008 the remediated brownfield site re-opened as a multi-use community center and public park. https://tclf.org/landscapes/artscape-wychwood-barns

Berczy Park, Toronto, ON | Constructed in 1982 in Toronto’s dense urban core, this park is a central amenity of the Saint Lawrence Market neighborhood. In 1966 the City appropriated the parcel, which was officially dedicated for use as a public park in 1973.  One year later it was named to honor William Berczy (born Johann Albercht Ulrich Moll), German-born painter and pioneer who, in 1794, was a co-founder of York (Toronto). https://tclf.org/landscapes/berczy-park

Berczy Park, Toronto, ON | Constructed in 1982 in Toronto’s dense urban core, this park is a central amenity of the Saint Lawrence Market neighborhood. In 1966 the City appropriated the parcel, which was officially dedicated for use as a public park in 1973. One year later it was named to honor William Berczy (born Johann Albercht Ulrich Moll), German-born painter and pioneer who, in 1794, was a co-founder of York (Toronto). https://tclf.org/landscapes/berczy-park

Mel Lastman Square, Toronto, ON | Named for longtime mayor of North York and (subsequently) Toronto, and designed by architect J. Michael Kirkland with Floyd and Gerrard Landscape Architects, this public plaza opened in 1989 to provide outdoor civic space for the then-independent City of North York. The 1.3-hectare parcel  comprises several discrete areas, marked by significant changes in elevation. https://tclf.org/landscapes/mel-lastman-square

Mel Lastman Square, Toronto, ON | Named for longtime mayor of North York and (subsequently) Toronto, and designed by architect J. Michael Kirkland with Floyd and Gerrard Landscape Architects, this public plaza opened in 1989 to provide outdoor civic space for the then-independent City of North York. The 1.3-hectare parcel comprises several discrete areas, marked by significant changes in elevation. https://tclf.org/landscapes/mel-lastman-square

High Park, Toronto, ON | Located on undulating land and supporting remnant black oak savanna in the Humber River watershed, this 161-hectare park was settled in 1836 by architect John Howard and named High Park for its position overlooking Lake Ontario. Throughout the twentieth century, the natural landscape has been enhanced by the construction of picturesque roads and the planting of non-native trees and groundcover. https://tclf.org/landscapes/high-park

High Park, Toronto, ON | Located on undulating land and supporting remnant black oak savanna in the Humber River watershed, this 161-hectare park was settled in 1836 by architect John Howard and named High Park for its position overlooking Lake Ontario. Throughout the twentieth century, the natural landscape has been enhanced by the construction of picturesque roads and the planting of non-native trees and groundcover. https://tclf.org/landscapes/high-park

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