Social studies - Gr. 5.3 - Canada: Shaping an Identity

General Outcome: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the events and factors that have changed the ways of life in Canada over time and appreciate the impact of these changes on citizenship and identity. (from Alberta Education)
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Explains the importance of Banff National Park as a Canadian symbol. Gr.2-4

Explains the importance of Banff National Park as a Canadian symbol.

One Christmas morning during World War I, when the guns stop firing, a young soldier ventures into no-man's land to free a robin caught on the barbed wire. Gr.1-3

One Christmas morning during World War I, when the guns stop firing, a young soldier ventures into no-man's land to free a robin caught on the barbed wire.

Historica Canada [website]

A founding member of Cape Dorset’s famed printmaking co-op, Kenojuak Ashevak introduced Inuit art to the world Culture

The text is simple and is combined with stunning paintings by award winning illustrator Ron Lightburn. The familiar poem, "In Flanders Fields," is included, along with information about the symbolism and history of the poppy and Remembrance Day -- all geared towards helping parents and teachers explain the significance of past and present wars and Canada's peacekeeping missions. Gr.1-4

Storytime Standouts looks at a Remembrance Day resource for young children, A Poppy Is to Remember by Heather Patterson and Ron Lightburn

Told from the point of view of a small teddy bear, one Canadian farm family misses their father, Lawrence Rogers, as he fights for England in World War I. They send Teddy to keep him company. Based on true accounts and written by the great-granddaughter of Lawrence Browning Rogers.

Told from the point of view of a small teddy bear, one Canadian farm family misses their father, Lawrence Rogers, as he fights for England in World War I. They send Teddy to keep him company. Based on true accounts and written by the great-granddaughter of Lawrence Browning Rogers.

After their triumph at Vimy Ridge, Canada's soldiers became the shock troops of the British army. In one battle after another, they led the way to victory through ferocious gunfire, poison gas and exploding artillery shells.

After their triumph at Vimy Ridge, Canada's soldiers became the shock troops of the British army. In one battle after another, they led the way to victory through ferocious gunfire, poison gas and exploding artillery shells.

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